Archive for July, 2015


Now that the dust has settled from the United States National Women’s┬áNational Team’s third World Cup title, it’s time to reflect and evaluate what the victory means. Despite FIFA’s best efforts to hold back the women’s game, this tournament was a huge success. Not only in the ratings department, but in the quality of the matches. The 2015 Women’s World Cup was the most entertaining to date, and that is largely due to the increase of talent not just in America, but around the globe.

The bar has not been set, it’s continuing to be raised, which is a great thing to see. Gone are the days of bashing women’s soccer because they’re not as good as the men. Of course there will always be misogynists out there, but the women’s game has risen above that. This Women’s World Cup demonstrated that women can beat defenders off the dribble. And yes, they can score from distance. No, not Carli Lloyd’s bomb from midfield, although that was an impressive goal. But consistently curling balls into the top corner from outside the box from both set pieces and the run of play. They can work triangles and knock the ball around like the Barcas and Bayerns of the world.

The popularity of the women’s game is undeniable at this point. The 2015 Women’s World Cup Final was the most watched soccer match in American history. The official champions t-shirt sold out in a matter of hours, before the shirts could even reach stores. And to further prove my point, they’re making the women’s jerseys in men’s sizes for the first time. Not only that, they’re selling. But the popularity needs to sustain itself.

Hopefully this latest World Cup triumph for the American women translates into long-term success of their professional league, the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL). Many of the teams in the league have already set record ticket sales for their first match after the World Cup final, and many of them are reporting an increase in ticket sales for future games post World Cup. A handful even sold out matches for the first time in their history. Not only do I hope it adds more support for the sport domestically, I hope the 2015 World Cup grows the game globally, with more countries joining the fray of an already crowded talent pool. Soccer Federations around the world should take notice and increase funding for the women’s teams and leagues.

Soccer in this country is already the most popular sport for girls, but it needs to continue up through the system. It can’t just be parents watching their girls play on the weekend and not caring after that. There should be support for the NWSL, an added interest other than the selfish nature of parents getting a bumper sticker on the back of their car so they can say “Hey look my kid plays soccer! Look at me!” Take your kids to a pro match. You never know, you might find yourself wrapped up in the action.

If you enjoyed watching the Women’s World Cup, that type of play happens in the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) every weekend during the spring through the summer. It shouldn’t only be about the flag and patriotism, only caring because it represents America. While that’s important and worthy of supporting, you should want to watch soccer for love of the game first and foremost. If you’re new hero is Carli Lloyd, she plies her trade in Houston with the Dash. If your favorite player is Alex Morgan or Tobin Heath, they play for the Portland Thorns. Megan Rapinoe or Hope Solo? Then check out the Seattle Reign. If you fell in love with the “Department of Defense” during the World Cup; Ali Krieger plays for the Washington Spirit along with fellow National Team teammate, goalie Ashlyn Harris. Julie Johnston plays in Chicago for the Red Stars, Becky Sauerbrunn plays for FC Kansas City and Meghan Klingenberg is teammates with Lloyd in Houston.

Up and coming star Morgan Brian also plays for the Houston Dash. Super sub Kelley O’Hara plays for Sky Blue FC in New Jersey along with National Team captain Christie Rampone. The trio of forwards, including Christen Press, can be seen in Chicago, Amy Rodriguez with FC Kansas City and Sydney Leroux up in Western New York with the Flash. Lauren Holiday and Heather O’Reilly are teammates in Kansas City. Lori Chalupny and Shannon Boxx play in Chicago. Whitney Engen plays for Western New York and Alyssa Naeher plays up in Boston with the Breakers.

Not only can you cheer on your favorite players from the US National Team in the NWSL, internationals for other teams that participated in the World Cup also call the league home. Canada stars Christine Sinclair (Portland Thorns), Erin McLeod (Houston Dash) and Melissa Tancredi (Chicago Red Stars). Australians Kyah Simon (Boston Breakers), Samantha Kerr and Caitlin Foord (Sky Blue FC) and England Lioness Jodie Taylor (Portland Thorns). In all 52 players in the NWSL participated in the World Cup, representing 9 different countries.

There is no excuse to not support the NWSL, as all the matches can be viewed in their entirety on YouTube. Many of them are live streamed, with the replay going up permanently on YouTube. You can even watch most of the matches in full 1080 HD. Tickets to attend matches in person are affordable; cheap by comparison to other top-tier pro leagues like MLB, NFL, NBA and NHL.

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The Police have released many singles over the years, with some getting both a 7″ and 12″ pressing. All of their singles have pressings from multiple countries. What is pictured below is the standard U.S pressing of the 7″ version of “Every Breath You Take.”

Along with the standard U.S. 7″ single, which has “Murder By Numbers” as the b-side and comes in a picture sleeve, there is also a promo version that comes in a stock A&M Records die-cut sleeve and has “Every Breath You Take” on both sides. There is also a 12″ pressing of the promo pressing with the same track listing. This picture sleeve is exclusive to the picture sleeve U.S. pressing. All U.S. pressings are done on black vinyl. There are four variants for the standard U.S. pressing; one has a W on the center label, one has a X on the center label, one has an R on the center label and one has a C on the center label.

On top of the U.S. pressings there are pressings from the following countries; UK, Ireland, Germany, Italy, France, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, general Europe, Japan, Canada, Costa Rica, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Philippines, Zimbabwe and South Africa. All the pressing that come in a picture sleeve come in the same one, which is pictured below. The only slight variation with the picture sleeve is that the Japanese pressing has Japanese writing on the cover. Every pressing that does not come in a picture sleeve comes in some variation of the stock A&M Records sleeve. All the European, North American and Asian pressings come in a picture sleeve. All the Central American, South American (except Brazil 7″ comes in picture sleeve), African and Oceania (Australia & New Zealand) pressings come in sock A&M Records sleeves. All pressings also have the same b-side, “Murder By Numbers,” unless there is an obvious exclusion like a single-sided record.

There are several UK pressings, including an incredibly rare and expensive double 7″ housed in a gatefold jacket. This double 7″ can fetch well over $100. It has four songs, one per side. On top of the single it has “Murder By Numbers,” “Truth Hits Everybody (remix)” and “Man In A Suitcase (live).” There is also a UK picture disc pressing, the only picture disc for this single.

There are two separate French and Brazilian pressings; one a 12″ and one a 7″. All the Brazilian pressings have the title of each song translated into Portuguese in parentheses after the English spelling. There is also single-sided Spanish pressing.

The Police - Every Breath You Take - Copy


Like many Police singles, there a countless pressings for “Spirits In The┬áMaterial World.” There are both 7″ and 12″ pressings, with the bulk coming as a traditional 7″ single, or most commonly referred to as a 45. There was only one pressing done as a 12″, which was a U.S. single that features an exclusive b-side (exclusive in the fact it’s only found on this vinyl single and no other single) “Secret Journey.”

Along with the 12″, there is also a 7″ U.S. pressing, which is featured here. The U.S. pressing of the 7″ has “Flexible Strategies” on the b-side. The artwork has three bars running diagonally across the middle of the picture sleeve, with the left half of the sleeve having a black background and the right half a salmon color. This cover art is exclusive to the U.S. 7″ pressing.

Along with the two U.S. pressings, there are also a UK, German, Italian, Japanese, Dutch, Spanish, Brazilian, Canadian, Peru, Australian, Greek and New Zealand pressings. The Canadian, Peruvian, Australian (small spindle hole), Greek, New Zealand (small spindle hole) all come in stock A & M Records paper sleeves or plain paper sleeves. Some of the European pressings have the same, exclusive covert art on the picture sleeve, which features a blue background with a headshot picture of the band printed in a lighter shade of blue. These pressings include the UK, Dutch, German and Italian. All those pressings also have the song “Low Life” on the b-side instead of “Flexible Strategies.”

The Japanese pressing has exclusive artwork as well, which the easiest to tell apart from any pressing because it has Japanese writing on it. It has “Flexible Strategies” on the b-side.f The Spanish pressing and Brazilian pressings are some more with exclusive cover art. The Spanish pressing uses the Ghosts In The Machine album art with a minor change; the single’s name is printed on it (Spirits In The Material World) instead of the album title. The Brazilian pressing has a black and white picture of the band in the center with two silver bands framing the picture along the top and bottom edge. The Spanish and Brazilian pressings have “Low Life” on the b-side.

The Peruvian and Canadian pressing is the only pressing to have the song title printed in a language other than English on the center labels, albeit in parentheses under the English portion. The Peruvian pressing has Spanish and the Canadian pressing has French. The Peruvian pressing also has “Too Much Information” on the b-side and the Canadian pressing has :Hungry For You” on the b-side, both of which are exclusive to their respective singles.

The Police - Spirits In The Material World US - Copy


Like many Police singles, there a countless pressings for “Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic.” There is a U.S., UK, Europeans in general, Italian, Japan, German, Costa Rican, Canadian, Irish, Brazilian, Australian, Dutch, Portuguese, South African, New Zealand, Philippines, Peruvian and Spanish. Some of these countries have multiple pressings as well, which only adds to the total pressing count. The pressing featured here is the regular U.S. pressing, which has a blue background with the outline of a heart in the center. The b-side track is “Shambelle.” An important note of this U.S. pressing is that there is a mis-press floating around out there that has the center labels switched around; so the a-side will play but have the b-side center label and vice-versa.

All of the pressings the Japanese is the easiest to tell apart, as it’s the only one with Japanese writing on the cover. There are two Italian pressings; one is a juke box single that has a Joan Armatrading song on the b-side. The other Italian pressing is identical to the U.S. pressing featured here. Several of the pressings in fact, are identical (minus catalog numbers) to the U.S. pressing featured here; the general Euro, Dutch and Portuguese. The Spanish pressing is very similar to the U.S. pressing, the artwork on the picture sleeve is identical, with the only difference between the pressings being that the Spanish pressing has the single title in Spanish rather than English. All the following pressings have “Shambelle” on the b-side, but don’t have a picture sleeve; Costa Rican, Canadian, Australian, South African, Philippines and Peruvian.

The UK and Irish pressings have an exclusive b-side. which is “Flexible Strategies.’ The artwork for both of these pressing is also exclusive, and different to any other pressings. Both have the band sitting on a carpet floor meant o resemble a cityscape. The German and Brazilian pressings both have “Shambelle” on the b-side but each has its own, exclusive artwork. The German artwork is the artwork from the UK and Irish pressing cropped into a smaller square, with a white border along the left hand side up around the top edge. This border has “Hit Come Back” printed along the top edge, which might be a singles series, and there is also some hype statements along the left side like “#1 Hit Single.” The Brazilian artwork is a picture of the band standing around, with Sting wearing short shorts.

The Police - Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic US - Copy


The Police have released many singles over the years, with some getting both a 7″ and 12″ pressing. All of their singles have pressings from multiple countries. What is pictured below is the standard U.S pressing of the 7″ version of “Can’t Stand Losing You.”

Along with the standard U.S. 7″ single, which has “No Time This Time” as the b-side and comes in a picture sleeve, there is also a promo version that comes in a stock A&M Records die-cut sleeve and both the stereo (a-side) and mono (b-side) versions of “Can’t Stand Losing You.” This picture sleeve is exclusive to the picture sleeve U.S. pressing. The picture sleeve has the back of all the band members’ heads with a black background that has the single title printed in red lettering along the top. All U.S. pressings are done on black vinyl.

On top of those two U.S. pressings, there are also a UK, German, Dutch, Portuguese, New Zealand, Irish and Canadian pressings. With there being so many different pressings of this single, the easiest ways to tell them apart are the track listing, color of vinyl and cover artwork. Usually either one of those or both are different from other pressings. The pressings can also be distinguished by continent/region. All North American pressings have the same b-side track; “No Time This Time,” and all European pressings have the same b-side track; “Dead End Job.” The New Zealand and Australian pressings, being from the Oceania region, one of the most unrecognized regions, both have “So Lonely” on the b-side.

All the European pressings, except for the Irish pressing, have the same cover art, which is a man hanging from a noose dangling above a block of ice. The Irish pressing comes in a stock A&M Recods sleeve, which is different than the stock A&M Records sleeve of the U.S. promo pressing. The Irish sleeve is all black with the A&M script logo printed across the top. The U.S. promo pressing also has the A&M logo printed across the top, but has records floating along the bottom of the sleeve.

The UK has a whopping 30 different pressings. Many of them have subtle differences. Some are more easily discernible, like the ones pressed on different color vinyl. Of the easiest ones to tell apart, there are pressings on red, green, yellow, white and black. Many of those colors have multiple pressings as well, which help make up the 30 different pressings total.

The hardest to tell apart UK pressings are all pressed on some variation of blue vinyl. There is a straight up traditional blue, dark blue and light blue pressings, with multiple variants of each of those different shades of blue. The light blue has the most, with three. The light blue vinyl variants can be told apart by have many rings there are around the spindle hole. One variant has three rings, the second has one wide ring around the entire spindle hole and the last has either four or five rings. One pressing of the traditional blue has two variants, one with a serrated rim around the enter label and the other with the serrated rim.

For the most part all the UK pressings come in a picture sleeve with the same artwork. However, there a few pressings that come in a stock A&M Records sleeve, which are all the black vinyl pressings. Some of the black pressings have stock A&M Records center labels printed on either red or silver. One black pressing also comes in the hanging man picture sleeve with the regular center labels used for majority of the European pressings.

The Police - Can't Stand Losing You - Copy


The Police have released many singles over the years, with some getting both a 7″ and 12″ pressing. All of their singles have pressings from multiple countries. What is pictured below is the poster sleeve U.S pressing of the 7″ version of “Message In A Bottle.” The b-side to all pressings is “Landlord.”

Along with the poster sleeve U.S. 7″ single, there is also a standard picture sleeve variant that has the same cover art as the poster sleeve variant. The standard sleeve also “Landlord” as the b-side. The standard sleeve variant is supposedly rarer than the poster sleeve variant, but the poster sleeve variant sells for more money. The poster sleeve folds out to reveal a poster of the Reggatta de Blanc cover art. The side of the poster that has the 7″ single cover art does fold out, but does not have a coherent image for a poster. It’s just the cover and the back of the sleeve on opposite sides of the poster, with a blank sea of blue in the middle.

Aside from the U.S. pressing, there is also a UK, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, Irish, Japanese, Canadian, Philippines, South African, Rhodesian (country now called Zimbabwe), Australian and New Zealand pressing.

The UK, German, French, Italian and general European pressing has different artwork for the picture sleeve than the U.S. pressing. It’s a photo of the band with a coke bottle smashed over it. The b-side for the UK pressing is “Landlord.” The German pressing has a slight variant with the cover though, as it has the British flag in the top left corner with the hype note “top hit” over top the flag. The Japanese and Spanish pressings utilizes the Reggatta de Blanc cover art and has Japanese writing on the cover. The Portuguese pressing has exclusive cove art on its picture sleeve. It’s a photo of the band with a white border around it that is centered in the sleeve.

The Irish, Canadian, South African, Rhodesian (Zimbabwe), Australian, New Zealand and Philippines pressings all come in stock sleeves.


The Police have released many singles over the years, with some getting both a 7″ and 12″ pressing. All of their singles have pressings from multiple countries. What is pictured below is one of the many variants of the standard U.S pressing of the 7″ version of “De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da.” It’s important to note that all of the standard U.S. pressings have the same catalog number, which is AM-2275. The U.S. pressing has an exclusive picture sleeve and b-side as well.

Along with the standard U.S. 7″ single, which has “Friends” as the b-side and comes in die cut picture sleeve, there is also a promo version that comes in a some sort paper dust sleeve and has both the stereo (b-side) and mono (a-side) versions of “De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da.” I say some sort of paper dust sleeve because I am not sure what the sleeve this U.S. promo pressing comes in. I have never seen pictures of one to confirm anything. It may come in one o the many versions of A&M Records’ stock sleeves or may come in a regular, plain white paper dust sleeve.

The aforementioned variants of the standard U.S. pressing can be told apart by both the type of sleeve and different etchings in the matrix. All but one of these U.S. pressings come in a die cut picture sleeve, with the stand out coming in the same exact picture sleeve, except that it’s not die cut. This non die cut picture sleeve pressing also has different center labels from the rest of the standard US. pressings, which is a silver background with a red triangle. The rest of the standard U.S. pressings come with a center label that has a yellow background with a blue triangle.

The standard U.S. pressings that come in a die cut sleeve have four variants. One has a ‘P’ etched in the run outs, another has a ‘T’ etched in the run outs, another has ‘PS’ etched and the last has only one composer printed on the b-side. There is also a unique U.S. pressing that has no English language songs on it. It has the Spanish version of “De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da” on the a-side and the Japanese version on the b-side. It comes in a picture sleeve with a picture of the band using cameras, with the background being the Japanese rising sun. That is on the cover of the sleeve, despite it’s not the lead track. The back of the sleeve has a picture of Sting wearing a sombrero. There is also a European pressing of this “Spanish/Japanese” single as well that has the same picture sleeve.

Along with the U.S. pressings, there are also a UK, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Irish, Portuguese, general European, Japanese, Colombian, Brazilian, Peruvian, Bolivian, Ecuadorian, Argentine, Chilean, Venezuelan, New Zealand, Australian, Mexican, South African and Philippines pressings.

The UK pressing has “A Sermon” on the b-side and comes in an exclusive picture sleeve. The picture sleeve cover art has a picture of what may be the band overlaid with “De Do Do Do De Da Da Da” in giant block lettering. I say the picture may be the band because to my eye it’s impossible to tell for sure or not, the picture may very well be of random people. The photo on the back does have a picture of the band however, and the picture also has an iguana in it as well. The UK catalog number is AMS 7578.

The German, French and general European pressings all match each other visually and musically. Their b-side track is “A Sermon” and catalog number for them is AMS 9110.

The Irish, Portuguese, Australian and one of the two Italian pressings match the UK pressing visually and musically in every way. The Italian,Portuguese and Australian catalog number is PAMS 7578 F and the Irish catalog number is the same as the UK’s. The Australian catalog number also has another set of numbers attached; K 8136 and K-8136. The other Italian pressing has an exclusive picture sleeve. The cover art is black and white picture/drawing of the band against a light orange background. The picture of the band is set inside a blue triangle. “A Sermon” is also on the b-side of this Italian pressing.

There are two Spanish pressings, one is a promo housed in a stock paper sleeve and the other comes in an exclusive picture sleeve. This picture sleeve has a picture of the band in the center with an orange border around the band picture. Everything on the sleeve runs at an angle from bottom left to top right. The catalog number for both Spanish pressings is AMS-9110. The Brazilian pressing also comes in an exclusive picture sleeve. It has an orange background with a blue triangle that starts from the bottom. The Japanese pressing comes in an exclusive picture sleeve as well. It’s the only one with Japanese writing on the cover, so it’s pretty easy to tell apart. The picture on the sleeve is the same cover art used with the album Zenyatta Mondotta.

The Colombian, Peruvian, Bolivian, Ecuadorian, Argentine, Chilean, Venezuelan, New Zealand, Mexican, South African and Philippines pressings all come in either stock A&M Records sleeves or plain white paper dust sleeves. One interesting note though, is that the Ecuadorian pressing was released on CBS Records, the only pressing not released on A&M Records.

The Colombian and Venezuelan pressings are the only 12″ pressings of this single. There are a two different variants for the Colombian pressing. They are both pressed on colored vinyl, the only pressing of this single to be pressed on colored vinyl. One is on green and one is on yellow.

The Police - De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da - Copy