Archive for April, 2017


Whenever a tour exclusive release is announced it always causes a pit in my stomach because there is usually means any collection I have going will likely stay, or become incomplete. Many times these tour exclusives are the lone outstanding item I need to complete a collection. Thankfully Asian Man Records did the right thing with this Dan Andriano and Mat Pryor Tour Split 7”, as they sold some copies online and made them available on said tour.

If you ask anyone that is the way to do it; make a release accessible to as many people as possible. It’s one thing for there to be a tour exclusive variant (I’m not a huge fan of those either), but it’s an entirely different thing for a release to only be available on a tour. People make the argument tour exclusives reward fans, specifically the most diehard or “true” fans in particular. But there will always be circumstances beyond any so called diehard or “true” fans control. For example, what if a tour doesn’t stop anywhere near them? Or they can’t go because they can’t afford to take off work for any multitude of reasons. Or they have a baby to take care of at home. Then there are the unforeseen medical reasons or other life things that get in the way, like weddings, child birth, funerals. Why should someone who happens to live in North Dakota or Alaska miss out on a record based solely on that circumstance? And why should that person be forced to pay $100 for said record on the secondary market if they want it?

Rant over. Back to the finer details of this split 7”. It’s not your traditional split, as both Dan Andriano and Matt Pryor sing on both songs (two songs on this split, one per side) and shared writing duties for one of them (the b-sided is a Paul Simon cover). The 7” is housed in a thin jacket, not a fold over sleeve or one of those paper sleeves 45 singles used to come in. It also comes with a download card/code, which yields you ridiculously large WAV files that are over 2 gigs in size. Those two songs are bigger files than some band’s entire discographies that I have in iTunes, and not bands with 2 or 3 albums either. For example New Found Glory, Alkaline Trio, Against Me! And Circa Survive.

This split 7” was pressed on two colors, white and black, each limited to 500 copies apiece. It cost about $10 if you ordered this online from Asian Man Records. Both colors were available online, with white being the only one to sell out (online) as of posting this.

Dan Andriano - Matt Pryor Tour Split - Copy

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Senses Fail released a new EP in 2016 entitled In Your Absence. It features three new songs along with two acoustic versions of songs off Life Is Not A Waiting Room (“Family Tradition”) and Still Searching (“Lost And Found”). However, the three new songs are acoustic as well, but full band. So in a sense this is an acoustic EP, but it’s not being promoted that way. The EP was released by Pure Noise Records, and is already on its second pressing.

The first pressing is spread across four variants, with all of them only being available through certain means. The colors are cream with black and maroon splatter [Pure Noise web store (Merchnow) exclusive limited to 300 copies], black and maroon smash (indie record store exclusive limited to 300 copies), gold (VIP ticket bundle exclusive limited to 500 copies) and white (mass retail exclusive limited to 900 copies). The second pressing is on half black/half white and is limited to 500 copies. I’m not sure where you can buy the second pressing, but it is available via Pure Noise’s web store (Merchnow).

In regards to the VIP ticket exclusives. The band embarked on a 15 year Anniversary Tour, despite only having one original member left. The gold was given to “oro” and “plata” ticket packages with the white, despite it being listed as a mass retail exclusive, was also given to “bronce” ticket packages. If you don’t know Spanish, “oro” translates to “gold” in English, “plata” is “silver” and “bronce” is “bronze.” Along with the records, the VIP bundles also had things like exclusive access to sound check, meet and greet, side stage access for the show, no waiting in general admission line, tour poster, signed set lists, enamel pin set, a plastic bg with a silk screened print professional photo with the band and a piñata party.

All copies come with a screen printed b-side and a download card/code. An insert is included as well, which has the lyrics and liner notes printed on it. There is a small rectangle hype sticker affixed to the top right corner, but it’s probably the worst designed hype sticker as it blends into the artwork. Not the brightest idea to put a red sticker on a red cover if you want it to generate hype and attract attention. Retail price on this is around $15, which is impressively affordable for a 12” EP with a screen printed b-side. The label could have easily charged $20 for this and it likely still would’ve sold as well.

What is pictured below is the indie store variant on black and maroon smash.


In what appears to be a series of releases, Equal Vision Records re-released On Letting Go (OLG) for the album’s 10th Anniversary in 2017, again giving it a deluxe edition just like they did with Juturna. Again, just like Juturna, the deluxe edition of On Letting Go is a triple LP housed in a triple gatefold jacket. And again, just like Juturna, the deluxe edition of On Letting Go is limited to 2500 copies. And yet again, just like Juturna, the deluxe edition of On Letting Go was pressed on a combination of splatter and mix/marble/swirl colors. And if those agains weren’t enough, just like Juturna, the deluxe edition of On Letting Go also has on etching of the album art on the F-side.

The colors are as follows; first disc on blue and purple a-side/b-side mix with black splatter. Second disc on white and blue a-side/b-side mix and the third disc is on red and gray a-side/b-side mix.  The mixing is minimal, as in there is barely any intentional difference between the layout of the b-side and a-side. It’s the same colors from each respective a-side. So even though EVR went out of their way to have a lengthy description of the colors, they could have, and should have, simply put them as blue and purple with black splatter, white and blue mix and red and gray mix. No need for the a-side b-side nonsense.

As aforementioned, the deluxe edition has an etching on the final side of the triple LP set, which is the f-side. The etching features just the balloon girl from the artwork, nothing more like was done with Juturna, which has more elements of the artwork, like the gate along with the girl. There is a hype sticker affixed to the top left corner of the jacket indicating it’s the deluxe edition, the pressing info and the color of vinyl. The hype sticker actually has the colors of the set properly labeled, like I did above.

The triple gatefold jacket with OLG is much worse than what was done with Juturna . With Juturna at least EVR went different imagery on each of the three panels. It’s actually great , expanded artwork. OLG has the same exact imagery on two of the three panels. And the middle panel just has the lyrics printed on it, in small white font. But hey, there is symmetry to the gatefold!

There is also no booklet or insert with the deluxe edition of OLG, while the deluxe edition of Juturna came with a great full size, fold out booklet. The download card/code that comes with OLG is also a bit of an issue. As it does not blatantly deliver the stems that are included with the purchase of the vinyl version of the deluxe edition. They are somewhat hidden in a notepad/word document that you have to be careful not to immediately delete once you unzip the file. Once you open that notepad/word document, the only text in it is a link for the stems download that you have to copy and paste into your web browser, and a download automatically pops up once the site loads.  The only reason I discovered this is because after I added the folder to my iTunes I realized the stems weren’t in there. So I went back and double checked the folder and found a file that wasn’t an MP3. Otherwise I would’ve deleted it without getting the stems. And while we’re talking about the stems, those files are huge. Over 2 gigs in size and they’re in WAV form. Plus, they’re not properly labeled after you import them into iTunes, so you have to go back to the folder once again to match up the corresponding track names and edit each track in iTunes.

Along with the stems for each song, the deluxe edition also includes demo version of all the album tracks except “Carry Us Away,” plus some demos of b-sides as well. The demos are found on the record (sides C, D and E) along with the download card/code. The studio album and demos are in 320 kbps MP3s.

So in short, the deluxe edition of On Letting Go is far worse than the deluxe edition of Juturna. The price point is the same between both of them too, $50 before shipping. Which makes OLG stand out for being worse even more. Thankfully I bought some other things with the deluxe edition of OLG so I saved a bit shipping by being able to spread it out amongst a few records, instead of having the full $5 and change shipping tacked onto OLG.

Eve 6 – s/t

Posted: April 20, 2017 in Vinyl
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There are always albums that likely won’t see the light of day on vinyl. But then an upstart label comes out of left field to license it in order to press it. And that is the case with Eve 6’s debut self-titled album. Originally released in 1998, it took almost 20 years for a label like Wargod Collective to have the gumption to press Eve 6.

The record was pressed on two different colors; clear/black swirl and red/black swirl. The clear/black swirl is limited to 300 copies and the red/black swirl is limited to 700 copies. Both colors are on 180 gram vinyl, and the record is obviously a single LP. There is a hype sticker, at least on the clear/black smoke copies, that indicates color. The hype sticker calls the clear/black smoke “smoky clear” though. A subtle difference, but one worth noting. An insert is included, which has the lyrics printed on it. No download card/code likely because this is a licensed release.

The red/black swirl was a bundle exclusive, exclusive to two different bundles in fact. One bundle with art prints (six different 4×6 prints) and another that included both variants. As of posting this the only variant sold out is the red/black swirl. The clear/black swirl is still available from the label’s web store (hosted by Merchnow) and whatever distros or indie record stores still have copies left.

Retail price on this is around $25, but you can find this for much cheaper if you shop around and/or take advantage of sales whether they be general markdowns or via coupon/promo/discount codes. I was able to get this for $17 shipped by taking advantage of a ridiculous 25% off sale an eBay seller/store was having plus a $15 off eBay coupon (not eBay bucks) for orders over a certain amount. But places like Bull Moose are selling this for $23, and they offer free shipping for orders over a certain price threshold.

Third Eye Blind – We Are Drugs

Posted: April 20, 2017 in Vinyl
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Third Eye Blind’s new seven song EP, We Are Drugs, was released on vinyl in November 2016. The vinyl version is the only physical release of the EP, which was released for free digitally. As a result there is no download card/code included with the record.

When pre-orders went live it was erroneously advertised as being a 10”. But once the record was released it was quite obvious it was a 12”. Despite this the band’s official web store still has this listed as a 10”. And they’re charging $20 before shipping for it, when every other retailer is charging around $15 before shipping.  I was able to buy this for $11 shipped.

All copies are on 180 gram white vinyl, and pressing info has not been released. The record comes with a printed dust sleeve, which has the lyrics printed on both sides, but only on a tiny portion of the reverse side. The reverse side also has the liner notes printed on it as well.


With the popularity of vinyl, you sometimes get re-pressing that are long overdue and releases getting pressed on the vinyl format for the first time that are long overdue. What you can’t control unfortunately is how they’re pressed. The Beavis And Butt-Head Do America Soundtrack was finally released on vinyl in 2016, but sadly as a picture disc.

My bigger complaint about this is that it falls into the cash grab category, capitalizing on two trends; picture discs and soundtracks. Lately the two go hand-in-hand, but that never used to be the case.  First it was the soundtrack craze, with labels cashing in on multiple facets of consumer culture; nostalgia, collectors and trendiness. There are film nuts and score/soundtrack nuts who will collect anything related to a film they like, and then there are people who don’t like the film, or haven’t even actually seen it, who still collect soundtracks/scores because they like the music. There will always be those who buy things for nostalgia’s sake, which sadly is a strong selling point with records these days. And it leads to things like picture discs, $35 single LP’s and stuff like My Little Pony and the Forest Gump Soundtrack clogging up pressing plants.

This soundtrack comes in a picture disc sleeve with a hype sticker affixed to the bottom right corner, with the sleeve having one of those re-sealable flaps. No idea on pressing info, and it will likely never be released because this is a major label release. No download card/code is included, which isn’t a huge shocker. The soundtrack was released for the film’s 20th Anniversary, which is noted on the hype sticker.

Circling back to the mention of $35 single LP’s, when this record first came out in April 2016, that was the price for it; $35. And it’s why I held off on buying this for almost one year after its release. It took that long for me to find it within the price threshold I wanted to spend. Prices have been steadily falling on this record though, just not fast/far enough. The price slashing has seemed to stall around $21. But considering original pressings were going for

The reason I wanted this comp is for the Red Hot Chili Peppers and No Doubt songs. The Chili Peppers contribute a cover of Ohio Players’ “Love Rollercoaster” and No Doubt has a song from their often overlooked The Beacon Street Collection; “Snakes.” Aside from those two bands, this comp features other big bands like Ozzy Osbourne, White Zombie, Isaac Hayes, LL Cool J and AC/DC.

This Beavis And Butt-Head picture disc does sound better than the Beavis And Butt-head Experience picture disc. There were some complaints with the sound quality of The Beavis And Butt-Head Experience picture disc.


With the popularity of vinyl, you sometimes get re-pressing that are long overdue and releases getting pressed on the vinyl format for the first time that are long overdue. What you can’t control unfortunately is how they’re pressed. The Beavis And Butt-Head Experience was originally released in 1993, as a picture disc. So this 2016 re-pressing being done as a picture disc is at least a bit understandable. Though no one would argue against it being pressed as a traditional record (on any color) in a traditional jacket with inserts and maybe even a download card/code.

My bigger complaint about this is that it falls into the cash grab category, capitalizing on two trends; picture discs and soundtracks (though The Beavis and Butt-Head Experience is not a soundtrack is the strictest sense). Lately the two go hand-in-hand, but that never used to be the case.  First it was the soundtrack craze, with labels cashing in on multiple facets of consumer culture; nostalgia, collectors and trendiness. There are film nuts and score/soundtrack nuts who will collect anything related to a film they like, and then there are people who don’t like the film, or haven’t even actually seen it, who still collect soundtracks/scores. There will always be those who buy things for nostalgia’s sake, which sadly is a strong selling point with records these days, and it leads to things like picture discs, $35 single LP’s and things like My Little Pony and the Forest Gump Soundtrack clogging up pressing plants.

Not much changed between the original 1993 pressing and this latest pressing released in 2016. The images on both sides of the picture disc are the same and the track listing is the same. The only minor differences are that the first pressing was a UK release (2016 release is a U.S. release) and the first pressing comes in a stock, die cut red  jacket, not a picture disc sleeve like the 2016 re-press. This jacket has a very large die cut portion, which is intentional in order to show off the picture disc. It’s just like the jacket that came with the Moneen/Alexisonfire Switcheroo Series picture disc I have, which you can read about here. The 2016 re-press has a hype sticker affixed to the bottom right corner of the picture disc sleeve, with the sleeve having one of those re-sealable flaps. No idea on pressing info, and it will likely never be released because this is a major label release.

Circling back to the mention of $35 single LP’s, when this record first came out in April 2016, that was the price for it; $35. And it’s why I held off on buying this for almost one year after its release. It took that long for me to find it within the price threshold I wanted to spend. Prices have been steadily falling on this record though, just not fast/far enough. The price slashing has seemed to stall around $21. But considering original pressings were going for

The reason I wanted this comp is for the Nirvana song, “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die.” Though there is an unnecessary lead in by Beavis And Butt-Head prior to the actual Nirvana track kicking in. If you’re not aware by now, I’m a huge Nirvana nut and will buy almost everything of theirs released on vinyl, even live bootlegs. So despite that lead in I bought it. Plus, at the time of its original release in 1993, this comp was the only place this In Utero b-side was released. Afterwards though, it was released as a b-side to the “Pennyroyal Tea” single and subsequent compilation releases like the With The Lights Out box set. This comp remains one of the only vinyl releases featuring the original version of this Nirvana song, along with the “Pennyroyal Tea” 7”. The 20th Anniversary Edition of In Utero has the 2013 mix of “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die.”

Aside from the Nirvana song, this comp features other big bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Megadeth, Anthrax, Aerosmith and even Cher. Yes, Cher may seem like an odd addition to anything Beavis And Butt-head related, but this comp has some original, albeit joke songs by Beavis And Butt-Head.

Some people are complaining about this re-press sounding awful, but what else can you expect with a picture disc? If you want audio fidelity you shouldn’t be buying picture discs. Is this record unlistenable? No. But it is one of the worst sounding picture discs I’ve heard? Yes. All the more reason this comp should not have cost $35 when it was first released, it’s not even worth $20.