For those unfamiliar, Tom Petty was in a band before forming the Heartbreakers called Mudcrutch, which figuratively and quite literally, laid the foundation for the Heartbreakers. Mudcrutch was popular in Florida and parts of the deep south, so much so that they actually hosted a somewhat annual music festival in their hometown of Gainesville, Florida that grew so large it become a problem on multiple levels for their neighborhood. And at one point in their short career (prior to reforming) they were actually billed above Lynyrd Skynyrd in 1971.

Mudcrutch was active from 1970-1975, but despite that relatively long run, they never actually released an album. It wasn’t until Petty decided to reform Mudcrutch in 2007 that the band finally released their first album a year later in 2008. The 2008 self-titled debut album from a band originally formed way back in 1970 is a unique circumstance, even by rock & roll standards.

The album has gone through two pressings to date, with both pressed as a double LP on 180 gram vinyl in a gatefold jacket. The first pressing (featured here) was released in 2008, with the second pressing released in 2016. One key difference between the two pressings is that the first pressing comes with a CD copy of the album, which comes in a card stock sleeve with alternate artwork. The second pressing does not come with a CD or a download card/code.

Pressing info was never released for either pressing. Retail price on the second pressing is around $30. The highest a copy from the first pressing ever sold for is around $65 (after a conversion form Euros), though people are currently trying to sell copies for $100.

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One of the benefits of buying singles back in the day was to get b-sides, which were mostly unheard by fans prior to the release of a particular single.  With almost every Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers 7” single released, you were almost guaranteed an exclusive, never before heard b-side track, and this “Jammin’ Me” single is no exception.

Taken from the album Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough), arguably their least popular album, the “Jammin’ Me” single went through 11 different pressings. Laying the foundation for the rest of this entry, there are two different U.S., German and UK pressings, an Australian, Italian, Canadian, Spanish (as in the country, not language), Japanese and UK pressing. For the record I don’t count promos as a separate pressing nor a unique variant for the most part. But I will list them here so people are aware they exist. Promos back then were very common place, and they’re all but forgotten these days with digital being the easiest way to send out material for review.

For the U.S. pressing, there is a 7” and 12” pressing. The 7” is featured here, and comes in a picture sleeve with the song “Make That Connection” on the b-side. The 12” has the same cover art as the 7” pressing, only scaled up to fit the format. The track listing is different with the 12” though, as it has the single, “Jammin’ Me,” on both sides. There is a also a promo version of the 7”, which has the single on both sides of the record, and it has plain white center labels as opposed to the stock rainbow MCA center labels.

The Australian pressing is a 7”, and is pretty much identical to the U.S. 7” pressing. Even the catalog numbers are basically the same, with the minor exception of the having a 7 in front of 50635 catalog number for the U.S. pressing. Another key difference is the Australian pressing is a small hole record and the U.S. pressing is a large hole.

Just like the U.S. pressing, the German pressing has a 7”’ and 12” pressing. The 7” pressing has the same cover art and track listing as its U.S. counterpart. The catalog number is different though; 258 331-7. The 12” pressing has three tracks, two on the a-side and one on the b-side. It’s the only pressing of this single to have more than two tracks. The first track on the a-side is the single, and the second track on the a-side is “Let Me Up,” another album track off Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough), though on the album the song is listed as “Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough).”  The b-side is “Make That Connection.” It has the same cover art as the U.S. 12”.

The UK pressing also has a 7” and 12”. The UK 12” is identical to the German 12”, save for one minor difference. The second track on the a-side is listed under its proper title; “Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough).” The 7” pressing, while featuring the same artwork as the U.S. and German pressings, has a different track listing. It has; “Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough)” on the b-side. It’s the only pressing of the single  not to have “Make That Connection” anywhere on it.

As is usual, the Japanese pressing is one of the easiest to tell apart. It has Japanese writing on the cover, which is about as obvious of a dead giveaway as you can possibly get. Other than the Japanese text, the cover art is the same as the U.S., German, UK and Australian 7” pressings. The Japanese 7” has “Make That Connection” on the b-side.

The Spanish pressing is a bit unique, in more ways than one. It’s the only pressing with completely different cover art. It’s also the only one that seems to be promo only. The cover art is inspired by the cover art for  the album Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) and the rest of the pressings for this single, but it’s done in black and white and has completely different imagery. It just has one eye, split into two separate pictures, set against a black background. This pressing has the single featured on both sides of the record.

The Italian pressing is a 7”, and other than the catalog number, which is, 25 8331-7, is identical to the U.S., German and Australian 7” pressings. The same goes for the Canadian 7” pressing, but it has the same catalog number as the U.S. 7” pressing. The only difference with pressing is that it was manufactured in and only distributed in Canada.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Jammin' Me - Copy

 


Tom Petty was one of many artists at the forefront of technological revolutions in the music industry. From recording the classic album Damn The Torpedoes live on analog tape at Sound City in 1978 to utilizing drum machines and digital recording methods on Southern Accents in 1985. Those drum machines are most notable on “Don’t Come Around Here No More,” which was released as a single seeing 11 different pressings.

The single, most famous for its Alice In Wonderland themed music video, draws a harsh line in the sand for some Tom Petty fans. It’s where he either lost diehard fans who enjoyed his music from the band’s debut album, or gained some more fans because the song, and the album Southern Accents as a whole, featured more mainstream sounds at the time. You see, that “sell out” debate has been raging long before scene bands ditched indie labels or changed their sound to cater to what was popular at the time.

What is featured with this entry is the U.S. pressing, which has quite a few variants. The photo below is of the standard version of the 7”, without the center label variation. If you read this blog enough or have some familiarity with 70s and/or 80s 45 RPM singles, you’ll know that some pressings have variants with very subtle differences. It’s not as simple as today where you see one record on blue vinyl, and another on red vinyl, and know those are two separate variants.

To better understand the U.S. variants, first there is a 7” and 12” variant. The 7” variants has variants within itself. The catalog number is the same for all of them though; MCA-52496. There is a promo 7” and the standard version, but within the standard version there is a center label variant. The main variant of the standard 7” has the catalog number printed on the left side, the variant has the catalog number printed on the right side. The standard 7” has the title printed on the top and artist on the bottom, the variant has both title and artist printed on the bottom. Those are the only differences. Both have the stock rainbow MCA labels with a blue background. Both come in the same picture sleeve and have the same track listing; with “Trailer” on the b-side.

The promo variant of the U.S. 7” has plain white MCA center labels, with some copies coming in the picture sleeve of the standard variant. But most copies came in plain paper sleeves with a die-cut  center hole. Promo copies have the single pressed on both sides of the record. On top of the 7” promo, the 12” variant also has promo copies. Those too have the single pressed on both sides of the record, and come in stock MCA sleeves with a black background and yellow ‘MCA’ text. The center labels are plain yellow instead of white. The promo 12” catalog number is  L33-1274, and it’s pressed at 33 1/3.

The promo 12” has a variant within the variant as well though. The other variant of the promo 12” also comes in a stock MCA sleeve, but this one has a black background with white ‘MCA’ text. The center labels are plain white MCA labels instead o yellow. The track listing is also different but has the same song pressed on both sides. This variant of the promo 12” has the extended version of “Don’t Come Around Here No More.” The sleeve has a hype sticker on it saying the record has the extended album version of the single.

With the U.S. pressing out of the way, let’s move on to the UK pressing. The UK pressing has tow variants; a 7” and 12”. The 7” is basically identical to the U.S. 7”, except it has a different catalog number; MCA 926, and slightly different center label, the stock rainbow MCA labels with a small hole instead of a large hole. The 12” is identical to the 7” except for the obvious size difference and the catalog number, which is MCAT 926.

There is also a Canadian pressing, which was done only as a 7”. It’s identical to the U.S. 7” pressing, right down to the catalog number. The only thing that makes it a separate pressing is the fact that it was only distributed in Canada.

The UK pressing is not the only European one. There is also a general European pressing, an Italian pressing and a Spanish (country not the language) pressing. The general Euro pressing, which was manufactured in Germany, has a 7” and 12” variant. Typically when you see a ‘Europe” pressing they’re either manufactured in Germany or the Netherlands/Holland.  The Euro 7” is identical to the U.S. 7”, save for the catalog number, which is 259 224-7. The Euro 12” is practically identical to the UK 12” except for one key difference, it has one extra song on it. There are two tracks on the b-side, with the extra third song on the single being “Spike.” Every of aesthetic thing on it is the same as the UK 12”. The catalog number for the Euro 12” is 259 223-0.

The Italian pressing was only done as a 7”, and it’s a carbon copy of the Euro 7”, even down to the catalog number. The only thing that makes it a separate pressing is the fact that it was only distributed in Italy. The Spanish pressing has the same cover art as all the other pressings that come in a picture sleeve, only it’s in black and white. It has the same track listing too, with “Trailer” on the b-side. The catalog number is S 259 224-7.

This is one of the few Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers singles with an Australian pressing that comes in a picture sleeve. It’s the same picture sleeve as all the other pressings in a picture sleeve. It has the same track listing as well, with “Trailer” on the b-side. It’s one of the few pressings to have the stock rainbow MCA center labels with a small hole though, The catalog number is 7-52496.

If you thought the New Zealand pressing would not escape the shadow of the Aussie pressing, you’re partly right. While they two pressings are basically the same, there is a key difference with the center labels of the New Zealand pressing. It has a large capital A or B printed on each respective side. Something the Aussie pressing does not have. Other than that fact about the center labels, they center labels for each of these pressings is the same basic stock rainbow MCA labels. Other than the center labels, the Aussie and New Zealand pressings are identical. The catalog number for the New Zealand pressing is very similar to the Aussie pressing, it’s 752496.

There is one oddball pressing of this single, which sometimes happens with stuff released from this era. It’s a South African pressing. The South African pressing is pretty much similar to all the other 7” pressings/variants. The only obvious difference is that the center labels, which are the stock rainbow MCA labels, have a small hole instead of a large hole. The catalog number is  LMCS 52496.

It should be no surprise at this point that the Japanese pressing is drastically different than all the other pressings.  While it has the same basic cover art for the picture sleeve, it does have Japanese writing on it, which is always a dead giveaway of its origins. The track listing is the same as all the other 7” pressings/variants. The catalog number is P-1961. On top of the standard version of the 7”, there is also a promo variant of the Japanese pressing. This promo 7” is identical to the standard version, the only difference is the promo markings on it, which are on the center labels.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Don't Come Around Here No More - Copy


As was the case with many singles released in the 80’s, the 7” single for Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers’ “Change Of Heart” has multiple variants/pressings. The lay the foundation, there is a U.S., UK and Japanese pressing, all with different covers, with some released on different labels. The U.S. pressings, yes there are multiple pressings, was released by Backstreet Records, while the UK and Japanese pressings were released by MCA Records. Granted though, Backstreet Records is/was an imprint of MCA Records. But the key difference to take note of is that the Backstreet pressing has Backstreet Records printed on the center labels and back of the sleeve, and obviously the MCA pressing has MCA printed on it.

Lets delve into the U.S. pressing first. There are two main variants of it, along with a 12” pressing as well. First off, I don’t count promos as a different pressing or variant. So there is a variant with a picture sleeve on black vinyl, and another variant on red vinyl that comes in a clear poly sleeve with a sticker on the front (pictured here). There are some copies of the red variant that do not come in that poly sleeve though, and those are considered promo copies by many. It’s also important to note that some red copies made it out with the picture sleeve from the black variant.

On top of that, there is also a variant of the black, which has slightly different center labels. On the main pressing for that variant, the title is printed on the top and the artist name on the bottom, but for this sub-variant the artist name is on the top and the title is on the bottom. Some may consider this an error pressing, either way it’s rarer and more expensive as a result than the main pressing of the black variant. Again, all copies of the U.S. pressing have stock Backstreet Records center labels, with the only differences being, if there are any, where things are printed on them.

Both variants come with the same track listing; “Change Of Heart” on the a-side and “Heartbreakers Beach Party” on the b-side, which is a true b-side. The 12” pressing, which is part of the overall U.S. pressing, has “Change Of Heart” On The a-side with a live version of the title track on the b-side. The 12” pressing comes in a plain white jacket with a die cut center.

For the UK pressing, it features the same track listing as the U.S. 7” pressing and the same basic cover art for the picture sleeve. The biggest, and most obvious difference with the cover art for the UK pressing is that it’s printed in black and white instead of color like the U.S. pressing.  Moving on to the Japanese pressing, it has completely different, and unique cover art. Instead of just Tom Petty standing wearing his infamous top hat, it’s has a shot of the entire band standing against a blue back drop, with the entire cover set against a black backdrop. Japanese writing is also on the cover, which if it wasn’t obvious enough, will easily distinguish the Japanese pressing from all others. The track listing is the same for the Japanese pressing as all the other 7” pressings.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Change Of Heart - Copy


Many Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers singles come with true b-sides, most of they do actually, but this “You Got Lucky” 7” single is one of the few that doesn’t. People may be familiar with the term b-side as simply an unreleased or unused song from a given album’s recording session, but the term’s roots are actually quite literal. I would assume most people who read this blog know where the term ‘b-side’ comes from, but for anyone unaware, it’s not simply an unreleased song. The term comes from a song that is not good enough for the album being recorded, or good enough for the a-side of a record, so it goes on the b-side.

Along with being one of the few singles to not have an unreleased b-side track, this single is also one to not have an abundance of variants. By abundance I mean not having 11, or even more, variants. The “You Got Lucky” single, while still having a lot of pressings, 10 in total, it only has three variants with any significant difference. For this record I’m using variants as having a different cover or track listing, not simply having a different country of origin; which I’m classifying as different pressings.

Before delving in too deep, the cover art for all the pressings, 10 in all, is basically the same. It’s a head shot of Tom Petty set against a red background, and has the artist name and title printed on the left hand side.

It seems to be the norm with Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers singles, but there are two different variants for the U.S. pressing; a 7” and a 12”. There is also promo version of this single from the U.S. pressing as well. The U.S. 7” has “Between Two Worlds” on the b-side, which is an album track off Long After Dark. The 12” has “You Got Lucky” on both sides of the record. The 7” was released on Backstreet Records, and has stock Backstreet center labels with a large hole. The 12” was also released on Backstreet Records. While identical in every way to the U.S. 7” pressing, the Canadian pressing only gets that distinction because was only distribute in Canada, and has such markings on the center label.

The UK pressing was only done as a 7”, and has the same exact cover art and track listing as the U.S. 7”. The same goes for the Dutch/Euro pressing. Both of those pressings were released on MCA Records, having the stock rainbow MCA center labels. The catalog numbers differ between those two pressings; the UK catalog number is MCA 801 and the Dutch/Euro catalog number is 104.917.

On top of those two European based pressings, there us yet another European based pressing. This one is from Italy. It too is released on MCA Records, but has a slight center label variant. It has the rainbow MCA center labels, but instead of having the recognizable blue background it has a black background. The track listing and cover art are identical to all the previous pressings outlined thus far. The catalog number is MCAN 52144.

I already briefly mentioned the Canadian pressing and how it’s identical to its North American cousin, the same goes for the Australian and New Zealand pressings. They are only considered separate pressings because of where they were distributed. The catalog number; BSR-52144, is the same for both of them. Both have the same track listing and cover art, and have the same stock rainbow MCA center labels, only with a small hole instead of the more traditional large hole. One important thing to note with the Australian and New Zealand pressings is that both MCA and Backstreet Records are mentioned on the record (center labels), but the catalog number only reference Backstreet Records.

If you’re familiar with Japanese pressings, because of the obvious alphabet difference, often times they have distinctly different cover art as a result. Sometimes they even have entirely unique cover art instead of just having Japanese writing on it. The later is true with the “You Got Lucky” single, which was done as a 7” for the Japanese pressing. Though while different from the U.S., Canadian, UK, Dutch/Euro, Italian, Australian and New Zealand pressings, the cover art is still inspired by the album Long After Dark. In fact the cover art for the Japanese single is exactly the same as the album art, only having Japanese writing. The track listing is the same as all the previously outlined 7” pressings.

The last two pressings for this single are oddballs. They come from Mexico and Peru. Mexico is the far more understandable country, but it’s still rare to have a Mexican distributed pressing. The Mexican pressing has basically the same cover art as the U.S., Canadian, UK, Dutch/Euro, Italian, Australian and New Zealand pressings, with the only exception having Spanish translations of the song names printed on the cover (front and back). The center labels, stock rainbow MCA labels, only have the Spanish translation of the song titles though. The catalog number is S-825. I don’t know much about the Peruvian pressing other than the fact that is exists and the catalog number. I’ve never seen photos of anything attached with it. The catalog number is 00521 44 1 and the track listing is the same as all the 7” pressings.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - You Got Lucky - Copy


If you’re a variant collector digging back through old 45 singles will drive you nuts. And that is not even counting singles that get pressed as a 12”, or maxi single, on top of the traditional 45 rpm 7”. Some singles have variants which only have minute, subtle differences, like different center labels or simply being pressed as different plant within the same country. You see, back in the 70’s and 80’s when digital and the internet didn’t yet destroy the physical marketplace for music, there was an abundance of pressing plants across the country. And many releases would be pressed at multiple plants in order to meet demand or a timeline.  It’s not like today where there are only a handful of plants still in operation, and a release only gets pressed at one of them.

The single for Tom Petty And The Heartbreaker’s “The Waiting” has 12 different pressings, but eight different variants scattered amongst them. It makes for a convolute mess trying to sort all of them out. It’s not as simple as oh this one is on a pretty blue color and that one is on red vinyl. It’s looking at catalog numbers, matrix numbers and/or center label layouts. Sure some of these pressings of “The Waiting” single have obvious difference like cover art to tell them apart, but it’s never that easy for all of them.

To start things off, there are four different variants for the U.S. pressing. The easiest one to tell apart is the 12” variant, for obvious reasons. The 7” variants are a mess, as they have different center label layouts. The catalog number is the same for all the U.S. 7” variants; BSR -5110. The cover art is also the same amongst all of them. There is a promo version, which has “The Waiting” on both sides of the record. All other variants of the 7” have “Nightwatchman” on the b-side. Here is where the U.S. 7” variants get out of hand.

One of the 7” variants has a variant within the variant. One of the plants used for this single was Gloversville, and amongst that pressing there is a batch that has the title print on the top (above the hole) of the center labels with the artist below the hole. Another batch has both the title and artist printed below the hole.

On top of the U.S. pressing, there is also a Scandinavian, French, German, Dutch, Japanese, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian pressing. The Canadian pressing, which has two variants, a standard and promo, is identical to the standard and promo variants of the U.S. 7” pressing, with the only difference being that is has manufactured in Canada in the credits. The same basic thing goes for the Australian and New Zealand pressings. Both of those are identical to each other save from the respective country they were manufactured and distribute. The catalog number is slightly different than the U.S. and Canadian pressings though; BSR 5110. The center labels are also different from their North American cousin, as they have stock rainbow MCA labels with a small hole.

The Scandinavian, French, Dutch and German pressings are all basically the same. They all have the same track listing, and except for the French pressing have stock rainbow MCA center labels with a large hole. The French pressing has stock pink MCA center labels. The cover art for all of them is the save, except for the German pressing. While basically the same as every other 7” pressing/variant described thus far, the German pressing has additional information and text printed on the cover. It has the same headshot of Tom Petty for the artwork, and same placement of the artist and title, but has the inclusion of the b-side track being listed on the cover along with production credits. The label and catalog number are also prominently printed on the cover in the top right corner.  The track listing for all the European pressings is the same, having “Nightwatchman” on the b-side.

The catalog number for the Scandinavian pressing is MCA 699. For the French pressing; 103159. For the Dutch pressing; 103.159, 103 159. For the German pressing; 103 159.

As is usual, the Japanese pressing if the easiest to tell apart. Not only does it have Japanese writing on the cover, the cover art is also different, and exclusive to this pressing. “The Waiting” single is also one of the few Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers Japanese pressings to have variants. It has both a standard and promo version. Both have the same cover art for the picture sleeve, the center labels are different. The standard version has the lesser used stock rainbow MCA center labels with a black background, while the promo version has plain white center labels. Both however, have the same track listing, with “Nightwatchman” on the b-side, which is a bit odd for a promo version, as they typically have the single on both sides of the record.

The cover art for the Japanese pressing, which is done as a 7”, is the image used for the album cover of Hard Promises, with a few changes. The Japanese single has black bars cut at an angle in the top right and bottom left corners, which is where most of the text on the cover appears. Another important note about the standard version of the Japanese pressing is that the record itself comes in a stock RCA/Victor paper dust sleeve, which has blue and white vertical stripes.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - The Waiting - Copy


As was the case with many singles released in the 80’s, the 7” single for Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers’ “Don’t Do Me Like That” has multiple variants/pressings. The lay the foundation, there is a U.S., UK and Japanese pressing, all with different covers, with some released on different labels. The U.S. pressings, yes there are multiple pressings, was released by Backstreet Records, while the UK and Japanese pressings were released by MCA Records. Granted though, Backstreet Records is/was an imprint of MCA Records. But the key difference to take note of is that the Backstreet pressing has Backstreet Records printed on the center labels and back of the sleeve, and obviously the MCA pressing has MCA printed on it.

Lets delve into the U.S. pressing first. There are many subtle differences between some pressings/variants. I would consider these variants, and not separate pressings because I doubt the label went back and pressed thousands and thousands more of these singles five different times. So with that ground work laid out, there are six variants for the U.S. pressing. They all have the same basic cover art for the picture sleeve. The only difference with the cover art is the inclusion of mentioning the album Damn The Torpedoes along the bottom. This variant has “FROM THE ALBUM DAMN THE TORPEDOES” printed under the photo of Tom Petty. The other variant, which is picture below, has no mention of the album anywhere on the cover.

Another variant involves the center labels. This variant has the cover with Damn The Torpedoes printed on it, just that the center labels has the title printed on the top and the artist printed on the bottom, instead of having both title and artist printed on the bottom. There is also a promo variant, which has the single appear on both the a-side and b-sides of the 7”. The promo variant also has white Backstreet Records center labels instead of their normal stock label center labels. The final variant comes in a plain white dust sleeve with stock MCA center labels instead of one of the Backstreet Records center labels that all the other U.S. variants come with. The b-side for the U.S. pressing is “Casa Dega.”

On top of the U.S. pressing, there is also a UK, Japanese, “Benelux”, Canadian, Brazilian, Australian and New Zealand pressing. The UK pressing is a double 7”, the only pressing to be a double 7”. It also features different, unique cover art. Instead of the picture of Tom Petty standing posed with his guitar in the center of the sleeve like with the U.S. pressing, the UK pressing has a photo of Petty performing live, which is centered along the left hand side of the cover. Because it’s a double 7”, the UK pressing has two more songs on it “Century City” on the b-side, “’Stories We Can Tell” on the c-side and “Something Else” on the d-side.

An important note with this double 7” UK pressing is that the main single is only disc one. The second disc is a bonus disc, which was recorded live in London. This is promoted on the cover of the UK pressing. The second disc even has different center labels than the first disc. The first disc has stock MCA labels, while the second disc has unique center labels with a white background and “Live In London” printed in big bold letters at an angle along the top.

If you’ve gotten this far, the suspense is probably killing you, but here you’ll find what “Benelux” means. Benelux is a name given for the countries of Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg by taking the first few letters of their names. It’s a seldom heard politico-economic union those countries have. The quasi state even has its own flag. With that out of the way, the Benelux pressing is completely unique to all its counterparts.  It has different cover art and track listing. The cover art is in black and white, and is the only pressing to mention the b-side track on the cover. One half of the cover has a white background and the other half is black, which is divided at an angle in the middle of the cover. There is a headshot photo of all the band members towards the top, with the band’s name printed above that. The title track’s name is printed below the band’s name and directly above the photo of the band, with the b-side track printed directly below the photo. All the text is aligned to the left side of the cover. The b-side track is “Century City”

The Brazilian pressing has it’s own exclusive track listing and cover art as well. The b-side is “You Tell Me” and the cover art is inspired by the cover art for Damn The Torpedoes. It has the same image of Tom Petty as the album and the same place of the band’s name, just that the single’s title is printed across the middle of the cover. Just below Tom Petty’s neck. This pressing has stock MCA labels as well, just a variant of them. It has the familiar rainbow labels, just with a black background instead of blue. It also has a small hole instead of a large hole.

The Japanese pressing also uses the Damn The Torpedoes cover art. The only exception is that there is Japanese writing all over the cover, primarily on the right hand side. No text is prined over the photo of Tom petty. I’m not sure if the Canadian pressing comes in a picture sleeve or a plain white dust sleeve, but it has the same track listing as the U.S. pressing and same stock Backstreet Records center labels with the band’s name on top and title on bottom. The track listing is the same as the U.S. pressing.

I’ve never actually seen a photo of the Australian pressing, but it has the same track listing as the U.S. pressing. I don’t know what the cover of the New Zealand pressing looks like, but it has it’s own exclusive track listing, with a live version of “Don’t Bring Me Down” on the b-side. The center labels are also unique, as they have both MCA Records and Backstreet Records printed on them, against a beige background with a burnt orange ring around the edge.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Don't Do Me Like That - Copy