Well, if you wanted Portugal. The Man to inexplicably become a hip-hop band, you got your wish. With their latest train wreck of an album, Woodstock, they’re appealing to the lowest common denominator. Somehow the lead single “Feel It Still” went gold, which just proves how bad America’s taste in music actually is. They make jokes about selling out and sell t-shirts saying “I Like Portugal. The Man Before They Sold Out;” but that is exactly what they did. They even have hype men, yes, men, not one lone hype man, perform on stage with them. All they do is flail their arms around trying to get the crowd to put their arms in the arm, but maybe 10 people actually do it. The rest just stand there. These hype men also double as background dancers. Fall Out Boy doesn’t even have choreography. That speaks volumes of what Portugal. The Man has become. They barely get any applause after songs now. I would say it’s sad, but they brought this upon themselves.

You could see their sound start to shift on their last album, Evil Friends, but I don’t think anybody saw Woodstock coming. I really enjoyed Evil Friends, but I find Woodstock a complete disgrace. The band has resorted to making memes poking fun at how bad Woodstock is. But hey, they landed another big national commercial spot with one of their songs, so who cares right?

To make matters worse, the vinyl version of Woodstock was delayed, with the deluxe box set delayed even longer than the standard vinyl version. To make up for this the band and/or their label, Atlantic Records, decided to send everyone who pre-ordered the deluxe wooden box set a special gift to make up for the long wait. This special gift was a “no vinyl” version of the album. This “no vinyl” version is literally an empty jacket. The jacket is about a plain as you can get too; plain white with a white embossing of Atlantic’s logo in the center, and a hype sticker in the top left corner explaining the “no vinyl” version. On the back are fake excuses as to why the vinyl version of Woodstock is delayed, and mixed into it are quasi political statements. Also included with the “no vinyl” version is an exclusive poster and download card.

Because the deluxe box set was delayed even further, the band and/or label decided to further apologize for it by sending everyone who pre-ordered a copy of the standard vinyl version free of charge. They supposedly sent out emails to everyone who pre-ordered the deluxe box set explaining this, but I never got one. Which resulted in me having to email customer service asking what was going on with order to finally receive my free copy of the standard version. This standard version comes in a gatefold jacket that has the traditional album art on it.

I finally received my copy of the deluxe box set on October 10, 2017, after a yet another delay. Initially, the deluxe box set was suppose to come be released on September 29, but it got pushed to the next week and didn’t started shipping till October 5. And let me say, the deluxe box set was not worth the wait. It’s a severe disappointment. The price tag for the deluxe box set was $40 plus shipping, which was an additional $9 for me.

The mock up given with the deluxe box set in the band’s official web store was 95% accurate, and it was listed as soon as pre-orders went live at the end of May 2017. No idea why it took so long to be released. Here is what comes with the deluxe box set: the record on 180 gram black vinyl packaged in an exclusive printed inner sleeve, “Feel It Still” 7” featuring alternate takes of “Feel It Still” with perforated blotter paper insert, a 24” x 36” fold out poster, six 8” x 10” band photos, a button, a slipmat, three sticky passes, a Bumper Sticker and a download card. All that stuff comes packaged in a hard cover slip lid box, which has the artwork from the standard vinyl version on it. The cover art and artwork on the back of the jacket are replicated on the box set. Even the artwork from inside the gatefold jacket with the standard version is replicated on the box set, as it’s printed inside the lid.

I mentioned above that the mock up in the band’s official web store was 95% accurate; here is where it differs. The mock up shows the “Feel It Still” 7” being on black vinyl when in fact it’s on maroon or ox blood colored vinyl. The 7” features four different alternate takes of “Feel It Still.” The album version of the song is not found on the 7”. Here is the track listing for the 7”:

A1 – Feel It Still (Alt-Structure Pre-Final)

A2 – Feel It Still (Day One)

B1 – Feel It Still (Structure Rework)

B2 –  Feel It Still (So Young Placeholder)

The 7” also comes with a blotter paper insert. It really has nothing to do with the record itself; while it somewhat relates to the band, it’s a completely random and unnecessary thing to include with a record. If you don’t know what blotter paper is, at least in the context it’s meant to be in for this instance, it’s most commonly used for dropping acid. Doses of LSD are most commonly distributed on little square sections of blotter paper, and the insert with this 7” has the perforations to divide it up by these tiny squares.

It’s important to note that depending on how you view things; the box set 7” may in fact be the second pressing of the single/release, as it was pressed as a 5” flexi post card for Record Store Day (RSD) that was only available from Music Millennium, an indie record store in Portland, Oregon, the band’s defacto hometown. It was mainly a gimmicky promo item and was used to gain entry into the band’s instore performance at Music Millennium on RSD. The store did put remaining copies of the flexi post card up for sale online for $5 plus shipping. Some people who bought copies online said they arrived bent, which isn’t surprising. I held off on buying the flexi post card once the deluxe box set was announced because I’d rather have an actual record than a flexi if given the choice. I do collect flexis though.

The other inaccuracy is not so much an inaccuracy but an omission. There was no mock up given for the slip mat. As you can tell from the photo below, it’s classic Portugal. The Man artwork, which was likely done by The Fantastic The, or better known as John Gourley, front man of Portugal. The Man. Those two things are the only things different from the mock up.

The sticky passes are a bit of a disappointment. They were advertised as being similar to VIP or Backstage Passes distributed at shows, and they’re very small. Most passes I’ve seen and been issued at shows/festivals are far bigger. A slight mix up with the sticky passes included in this box set is that they have “All Access Photo” printed on them, so they’re technically not VIP or Backstage Passes; they’re press/media pass replicas.

The poster, while on the large side, is a bit of a disappointment too. Especially when compared to the poster that was included with the “no vinyl” version. Instead of artwork, one side is a terrible live photo of just John (not worth mentioning the roadie in the background) while the reverse side has the lyrics printed on it. So if you were only to buy this deluxe box set of Woodstock, the only way to read the lyrics as you listen to the album is to awkwardly deal with this huge fold out poster.

The six 8” x 10” band photos are black and white promo photos of each band member. Most of them are horrible photos, either silhouettes or literally a shot of their backs as they walk on stage. Look at the photos of them below and judge for yourself. The button is on the large side, the item listing on the band’s web store says it’s 2.5”, and I believe it. It’s a bland button though, black background with white lettering reading Wood Stock on two lines. Same with the bumper sticker. It’s all black with white lettering, having lyrics from “Feel It Still” printed in large font. The bumper sticker is actually two separate stickers. One large one with the lyrics printed on it and a much smaller one with the band’s logo and ‘1966’ and ‘1986.’

When pre-orders for Woodstock went live, the listing for the deluxe box set made it clear the record would not come in any sort of jacket, especially not the gatefold jacket the standard vinyl version came in. That it would come in a “printed inner sleeve.” Well, that is part true. The box set does come with a printed inner sleeve, it’s just that the record does not actually come in it. I know I’m splitting hairs, but it’s worth mention because the record comes in a plain black paper dust sleeve. This printed inner sleeve is exclusive to the box set. It’s different than the one that comes with the standard vinyl version. But it’s not much to speak of however. It’s all black with white font that just has ‘1966’ printed on one side and ‘1986’ printed on the other side.

I already touched on the “no vinyl” version, and the deluxe box set version, now it’s time to delve into the standard vinyl version. It comes housed in a gatefold jacket, with the record coming in a very thin printed dust sleeve on glossy paper. Standard printer paper is actually thicker than the paper used for this dust sleeve. For what might be the first pressing, the record is pressed on 180 gram black vinyl, just like the record that comes with the deluxe box set. A download card is included. The artwork inside the gatefold jacket is liner notes. It’s a lame move, as liner notes typically go on the dust sleeve or insert.  The printed dust sleeve with the standard vinyl version does have the lyrics printed on it, with the corresponding lyrics printed on its respective side. It appears the a-side is dubbed “1966” and the b-side is dubbed “1986,” which is taken from the now gold status single, “Feel It Still.”

For what might be the second pressing of the standard vinyl version, which was announced in August 2017, is on pink vinyl. It’s part of the “Ten Bands One Cause” campaign, which has the funds from sale go to Gilda’s Club NYC, an organization that provides community support for both those diagnosed with cancer and their caretakers. It is named after comedian Gilda Radner, who passed away from cancer at the age of 43 in 1989. No word on pressing info for this second pressing, but Discogs says it’s limited to 3,000 copies. Don’t believe that number because pressing info was no officially released for this record. That is the cute thng about Discogs, anyone with an account can edit any release, entering in incorrect info for whatever reason. The pink variant/pressing costs the same as the 180 gram black variant from first pressing; around $18.

I saw might be first/might be second because all vinyl versions of Woodstock were delayed for so long it’s impossible to tell if the label went back and pressed the pink copies after the black copies. Originally slated for a June release, the standard vinyl version did not ship till early August, and the deluxe box set version did not ship till early October. It wouldn’t surprise me if they delayed releasing the standard vinyl version to not take away sales of the breast cancer pink variant/pressing. The pink variant/pressing was announced in late August with a release date in early October.

It’s worth noting that even with all the delays, this record sound terrible. It’s not just the music on it that is awful, the sound quality of the pressing itself is bad. It’s mixed too low, it’s muddy and just downright terrible in terms of sound quality. This means they likely used not just an MP3/digital master, but a low quality one at that. Lots of people are reporting in that this record sounds awful, so it appears to be a widespread problem regardless of people’s setups. I don’t often discourage people from buying a record(s), but given how bad this album is in general, combined with the poor sound quality of this pressing, I would not recommend anything waste their money on the vinyl version of Woodstock.

If anyone wants to buy a copy of the standard vinyl version, in the gatefold jacket on 180 gram black vinyl, still factory sealed please leave a comment. $15 ppd shipped to the USA only. Don’t want to sell this internationally/outside the USA.

Just for reference, here is the order of the photos below: “no vinyl” version and all associated items photos 1-3. Standard vinyl version photos 4-7. Deluxe box set and all associated items photos 8 to the end.

 

 

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The second pressing of Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers’ Greatest Hits slightly differs from the first pressing. Both are pressed as a double LP, but the key difference is the artwork. The first pressing, released in 1993, features a group shot of the band in a bubble set against a red background. The second pressing features a group shot of the band, which is a reflection in either a mirror or a pan with water that someone (not a band member) is holding. Both pressing come in gatefold jackets, with the gatefold artwork differing between them. I don’t think an insert is included with either pressing, I’m certain about the second pressing. The center labels differ between the pressings as well. The first pressing has stock black MCA labels while the second pressing has red and black labels with the band’s logo along with Geffen’s. The first pressing was a Dutch release, and was never made available outside of Europe. The second pressing is widely available, but is a U.S. pressing.

The second pressing (featured here) has a small yellow circle hype sticker that erroneously advertises that this is the first time the album is on vinyl. As aforementioned, it was released in 1993 in Europe. It was out of print for over two decades until 2016. The hype sticker does correctly advertise that the pressing is on 180 gram vinyl; black vinyl to be precise. No download card is included, nor is an insert. Just the two records in poly lined paper dust sleeves slid into their respective pockets of the gatefold jacket.

The biggest appeal for this Greatest Hits album is that is has two exclusive, (brand new at the time of original release in 1993) songs on it; “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and “Something In The Air.” They are tacked on to the end of the album. So there is a draw for everyone, even people who already own Tom Petty And The Heartbreaker’s complete discography.

Retail price when it first came out was around $30 (before shipping), but now prices are starting to come down a bit on the secondary market, as you can find new copies for around $25 plus shipping. I’m guessing the market is flooded with these or record stores over estimated the demand for it. I picked this up for $18 shipped after taking advantage of a ridiculous eBay sale combined with an eBay coupon. No word on pressing info, but it’s likely in five digit numbers.

This was a long rumored re-press, and it was put on hold for what seemed like an eternity. It was put up for pre-order, and then abruptly pulled multiple times. Years actually went by without word about this. But then, when most people had given up on it, Bull Moose put up a pre-order for it with a confirmed release date. I think the biggest problem with this was Amazon and message boards. Amazon sometimes put things up for pre-order way too far in advance, and then people see it on Amazon, post about it on message boards, and the excitement grows.

This never used to be the case. The biggest culprit message board use to be a source of solid information without clutter or rumors. Threads used to be started only when an official pre-order was launched. But now it’s full of people starting threads with titles like “PO SOON” or “Soon?” or simply started a thread about a re-press because the band talked about something on stage or they talked to a band member after a show and asked them, and was told such and such. Basically high school gossip gets threads started there now, and it results in the typical internet BS of people calling the guy who started the thread a moron (or a variety of other names) and other trolling mixed with honest conversation, leading to multiple pages of useless posts that make it rather difficult to actually find useful information.

So when someone saw that Amazon had Greatest Hits up for pre-order they rushed to make a thread despite there being no official announcement about the album being re-pressed. When typically major artists like Tom Petty have press releases sent out to announce such things, let alone the fact that social media is a vital PR tool now. Had a thread never been started on that message board, it wouldn’t have spread like wild fire. Granted, other online distros and even Bull Moose put up pre-orders themselves shortly after Amazon only to have to take them down too. But the damage was done before that.

Anyway, this re-press eventually did get released with pre-orders that didn’t have to get pulled and refunded. But it was still wrought with delays. People were fed up with it all and there was little to no fanfare when the record finally started shipping. Not even a sarcastic “I finally got it” comment anywhere.

 

 


Box sets have seemed to be picking up steam, with many big name bands and artists having their discography made into a vinyl (or even CD) box set. Sometimes these box sets are for a special occasion, like some sort of anniversary, and other times it’s to offer up newly re-mastered albums in a one stop shop fans. Then there are other times where it seems labels are catering to diehard fans with the release of a box set, as the albums found within are eventually, or even at the same time or before, release as standalone releases outside of said box set. The later is the case with Tom Petty’s discography, both with The Heartbreakers and “solo” albums. I say “solo” because many times his backing band was comprised of members of The Heartbreakers.

The Tom Petty box sets, yes box sets, were announced in late 2016. The two separate box sets were divided up by era, the first from 1976-191 and the second from1994-2014. Many people hoped the albums would be release outside of the box set at some point, and they eventually got their wish.

The label smartly, or annoyingly depending on how you look at it, did release all but one of the albums from both box sets individually as standalone releases, but likely deliberately waited a while in a likely attempt to sell more box sets. I was contempt with waiting for standalone releases to round out my Tom Petty collection, or at the very least wait for a significant price drop in the $260 retail price of each box set if I had to bite the bullet and buy them.

The Last DJ was one of the few albums missing from my Tom Petty collection, and I was never going to spend the upwards of $150 to obtain a copy of it. Though I still might have to shell out for a copy from the first pressing to suit my oddball collector habit.

There are some key difference between the first and second pressing. The first pressing, released in 2002, had a U.S. and German release, and was done as a single LP. The second pressing, featured here, was pressed as a double LP, and features an etching on the d-side. This etching was not announced by the label at any point. I didn’t hear nor read anything about it, and you think the label would use it as a selling point because some people like frivolous add ons like that with records these days. The etching, while nicely done, is simply the album’s logo. Much like the re-press of Echo.

I don’t have a copy of the first pressing to do a sound comparison, but I’m willing to bet the second pressing sounds better for the simple fact that it’s not compressed down to a single LP. The second pressing is re-mastered, but I doubt this results in drastically better sound. The tracks being expanded onto an additional side should inherently decrease on some of the classic pitfalls of records sounding awful. Because of the oddball collector in me, I want to add a copy of the original pressing for the lone fact that it’s a single LP instead of a double LP.

The second pressing comes in a gatefold jacket with an insert. The insert has the lyrics printed on one side with photos of the band on the reverse side. I would say they’re black and white photos, but the entire insert is likely purposely not done in color for whatever reason.

Retail price on it is around $22, which is only $1 more for the single LP releases that came out of these box sets. But it’s still better than spending between $100-300 for a copy from the original pressing, regardless of sound quality, which was the going rate before this re-press. Prices of the original pressing have yet to drop, but I suspect, or at least hope, that they will drop given the release of a new, widely available pressing.

No word on pressing info, but it’s likely in five digits after you take into account the box set (which they seem to be re-pressing). All copies come with a silver rectangle hype sticker affixed to the bottom left corner that points out this pressing is re-mastered.


Box sets have seemed to be picking up steam, with many big name bands and artists having their discography made into a vinyl (or even CD) box set. Sometimes these box sets are for a special occasion, like some sort of anniversary, and other times it’s to offer up newly re-mastered albums in a one stop shop fans. Then there are other times where it seems labels are catering to diehard fans with the release of a box set, as the albums found within are eventually, or even at the same time or before, release as standalone releases outside of said box set. The later is the case with Tom Petty’s discography, both with The Heartbreakers and “solo” albums. I say “solo” because many times his backing band was comprised of members of The Heartbreakers.

The Tom Petty box sets, yes box sets, were announced in late 2016. The two separate box sets were divided up by era, the first from 1976-191 and the second from1994-2014. Many people hoped the albums would be release outside of the box set at some point, and they eventually got their wish.

The label smartly, or annoyingly depending on how you look at it, did release all but one of the albums from both box sets individually as standalone releases, but likely deliberately waited a while in a likely attempt to sell more box sets. I was contempt with waiting for standalone releases to round out my Tom Petty collection, or at the very least wait for a significant price drop in the $260 retail price of each box set if I had to bite the bullet and buy them.

Echo was one of the few albums missing from my Tom Petty collection, and I was never going to spend the upwards of $200 to obtain a copy of it. Though I still might have to shell out for a copy from the first pressing to suit my oddball collector habit.

There are some key difference between the first and second pressing. Both pressings were done as a double LP, but second pressing only runs on three sides. For whatever reason the label decided to do an etching on the d-side of the second pressing rather than have the album properly flow onto all four sides like the original pressing did. And they purposely held back this information, as I didn’t hear nor read anything about an etching.

I don’t have a copy of the first pressing to do a sound comparison, but I’m willing to bet the first pressing sounds better for the simple fact that it’s not compressed down to three sides. The second pressing is re-mastered, but I doubt this resulted in the tracks suddenly becoming smaller; at least not without being heavily compressed and losing fidelity as a result. So it’s for this reason that I am considering buying a copy from the first pressing, if not just for the audio quality but to have a true double LP copy.

The aforementioned etching is nicely done though, it’s of the albums logo. Along with the etching the double LP comes in a gatefold jacket with the records in printed dust sleeves. These dust sleeves are rather plain though; white paper with black and white photos of the band on one side and the album’s logo on the reverse side.

Retail price on it is around $22, which is only $1 more for the single LP releases that came out of these box sets. But it’s still better than spending between $100-300 for a copy from the original pressing, regardless of sound quality, which was the going rate before this re-press. Prices of the original pressing have yet to drop, but I suspect, or at least hope, that they will drop given the release of a new, widely available pressing.

No word on pressing info, but it’s likely in five digits after you take into account the box set (which they seem to be re-pressing). All copies come with a silver rectangle hype sticker affixed to the top right corner that points out this pressing is re-mastered. For those curious, the first pressing was released in 1999 and the record was out of print for over a decade until 2017.


Box sets have seemed to be picking up steam, with many big name bands and artists having their discography made into a vinyl (or even CD) box set. Sometimes these box sets are for a special occasion, like some sort of anniversary, and other times it’s to offer up newly re-mastered albums in a one stop shop fans. Then there are other times where it seems labels are catering to diehard fans with the release of a box set, as the albums found within are eventually, or even at the same time or before, release as standalone releases outside of said box set. The later is the case with Tom Petty’s discography, both with The Heartbreakers and “solo” albums. I say “solo” because many times his backing band was comprised of members of The Heartbreakers.

The long rumored re-press of the She’s The One Soundtrack was put on hold for what seemed like an eternity. It was put up for pre-order, and then abruptly pulled multiple times. Then the Tom Petty box sets, yes box sets, were announced. The two separate box sets were divided up by era, the first from 1976-191 and the second from1994-2014. For those paying close attention, She’s The One would be include with that second box set, aptly titled The Complete Studio Albums Volume 2. Most people logically assumed the box set was the reason behind the standalone LP of She’s The One was pulled, and they were likely right. And many of those same people hoped it would be release outside of the box set at some point.

The label smartly, or annoyingly depending on how you look at it, did release all but one of the albums from both box sets individually as standalone releases, but likely deliberately waited a while in a likely attempt to sell more box sets. I was contempt with waiting for standalone releases to round out my Tom Petty collection, or at the very least wait for a significant price drop in the $260 retail price of each box set if I had to bite the bullet and buy them.

The second pressing of She’s The One is pressed as a single LP on 180 gram black vinyl. It’s just the record crammed into a single pocket jacket. No insert, no gatefold jacket, no download card/code. In other words, they cheaped out with this re-pressing, especially when compared to some other re-pressing they did for out of print Tom Petty albums, which you can read about here and here.

Retail price on it is around $21, and considering they’re only charging $1 more for double LP’s that are much nicer in quality, this She’s The One re-press is a joke. But it’s still better than spending between $100-300 for a copy from the original pressing, which was the going rate before this re-press.

No word on pressing info, but it’s likely in five digit numbers after you take into account the box set (which they seem to be re-pressing). All copes come with a dark blue rectangle hype sticker affixed to the top right corner that points out this pressing is re-mastered. The first pressing was released in 1996. It too was a single LP, but was pressed on translucent vinyl. There is no specific color given, but some people describe the color as translucent brown or orange.

For those unfamiliar with this album, it’s a bit of an oddity. Tom petty was tabbed with composing the soundtrack for the film She’s The One. What turned out was basically a Tom Petty album more than a straight forward soundtrack or score. As a result many Tom Petty fan consider this soundtrack part of the band’s discography.

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - She's The One - Copy

 


Time Life, the people behind those late night music collection infomercials, seem to be getting into the vinyl game, as they’re releasing what appears to be a series of records. So far they’ve only done three volumes, but there is no indication they will stop there. These thankfully aren’t being pitched on late night tv, but are being hawked online for $25 for a single LP. Even going as far as to capitalize on Prince’s death with a purple colored variant in a second pressing that they’re actually charging more for than the black variant from the first pressing.

The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Live Series is currently on its third installment. If you’re not familiar with the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony, they typically feature the inductees performing along with special guests and various bands/artists perform cover versions in tribute. They’re usually star studded affairs, featuring some of the biggest names in music. Each volume in this series features exclusive live tracks recorded at several induction ceremonies. Volume 1 features an eclectic mix with the likes of Chuck Berry, Bruce Springsteen, Green Day, Al Green, James Taylor, Cream, Tom Petty, Prince, Metallica, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Flea, Joe Perry, Mick Jagger, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood and Dhani Harrison. I bought this compilation because it fills out several collections I have going; Green Day, Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty.

Volume 1 has actually gone through two pressings, unnecessarily so in fact. The first pressing is still readily available. But the folks behind the release decided to be shameless and capitalize on Prince’s death by pressing a new purple variant, in turn releasing a second pressing. They’re also charging more for it than the first pressing. It’s only $1 more; $26 instead of $25, but that is not the point. The record is advertised as being on 180 gram vinyl (first press), but it’s not.

Considering the hefty price tag for this record there should be more to it than just a standard weight black record crammed into a thin single pocket jacket. But that’s all it is. No insert, no printed dust sleeve, no gatefold jacket, no download card/code; nothing extra to eat into profit. One reason for the higher than average price tag might be the possible royalties and licensing fees involved with releasing this compilation. But still no excuse for charging $25 for a no frills single LP.

But with that initial retail price in mind, copies are starting to pop up on the secondary market at  slashed prices. You can pick up a copy for around $20 shipped. Some sellers have copies listed for $15 before shipping.

Pressing info has not been released for either pressing. One easy way to tell apart the first pressing, which is on black vinyl from the second pressing, which is on purple vinyl is by the addition of a second hype sticker on the second pressing. The second pressing has a purple sticker that reads “Limited Prince Tribute Edition On Purple Vinyl!” Both pressings have the same black hype sticker that says “First Time On Vinyl!” The barcodes are also different between pressings. The first pressing barcode is 6 10583 52622 6. The second pressing barcode is 6 10583 53172. The barcodes will help you discern the pressings if you’re looking to buy a copy of this record online. It’s fool proof to tell the pressing apart too.

Here is the track listing, with the year of the performance in parentheses:

Side A

  1. Chuck Berry With Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Johnny B. Goode (1995)
    2. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out (1999)
    3. Al Green – A Change Is Gonna Come (1995)
    4. Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Ron Wood, Joe Perry, Flea And Metallica – The Train Kept-A-Rollin’ (2009)
    5. Metallica – Iron Man (2006)

 

Side B

  1. James Taylor – Woodstock(1997)
    2. Cream – Sunshine Of Your Love (1993)
    3. Green Day – Blitzkrieg Bop (2002)
    4. Mick Jagger, Bruce Springsteen And The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Band – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (1988)
    5. Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood, Dhani Harrison And Prince – While My Guitar Gently Weeps (2004)

VA - Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Live Vol. 1

 

 

 


Shortly after the release of their debut album, Mudcrutch released a live EP aptly titled Extended Play Live!. The four song EP was recorded during the band’s 2008 tour. The first two tracks, “The Wrong Thing To Do” and “Bootleg Flyer” were recorded at the Ventura Theatre in Ventura, CA on April 20, 2008. The final two tracks, “High School Confidential” and “Crystal River” were recorded at the Troubadour in West Hollywood, CA on separate dates, May 2 and April 28 respectively.

Pressing info was never released, but all copies are on black vinyl. There is a hype sticker advertising who is in band and also mentions a “full dynamic range audiophile” CD is included. Well my copy, which I bought new and arrived factory sealed, did not come with this CD, nor any CD at all. You see, along with my problem, some people report that their copy of this live EP came with a copy of Mudcrutch’s self-titled album instead of the CD it’s supposed to come with, which is of the EP.

Mudcrutch - Extended Play Live! - Copy