Posts Tagged ‘RSD’


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The George Carlin album was one of those things, but didn’t actually expect my store to get because it was one of those “regional” releases. My store puts a list up of everything they get on their website, and this George Carlin release wasn’t on it. The George Carlin record was another thing I could live without and could have easily been scratched from my list. But I opted to keep it on my list despite my store likely not getting copies, and when I got inside the guy picking my records (my store does it menu style – tell them what you want and if they have it they grab it for you) gave me all my stuff and said “you’re 100%.” I was shocked for once on RSD.

As aforementioned, the George Carlin record was a regional release and those regional releases are typically extremely limited by RSD standards; as in less than 1,000 copies are usually pressed. For example, this George Carlin record was limited to 955 copies. Other regional releases this year were limited to 500 copies, 750 copies, and one was even limited to a miniscule 200 copies.

All copies of this George Carlin – Jammin’ In New York were pressed on black vinyl. It does not come with an insert nor a download card/code. It’s as bare bones as you can get. A flimsy black record stuffed into a cheap, thin jacket. The shrink wrap job was even amateur. This album was first released on CD in 1992 by Eardrum Records. The vinyl version was released by Comedy Dynamics, and it’s not their first rodeo with vinyl. They should be ashamed of themselves for releasing such a poor product that only has five tracks and charging top dollar for it; $18.

George Carlin - Jammin' In New York - Copy

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Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead four paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. I have a complete Thrice collection going and didn’t want to ruin that or have to pay upwards of $30 for a 7” if it was somewhat easily avoided. This 7” features two songs, one b-side from the To Be Everywhere Is To Be Nowhere and a live version of a song of that album as well. I don’t consider a song recorded live at a radio station to be a b-side, even though this 7” was marketed as having “2 b-sides”

The one b-side is entitled  “Sea Change” and is apparently about sea levels rising and climate change based on Twitter posts Dustin Kensrue made the day of RSD, which coincidentally was also Earth Day. I didn’t get that meaning after listening to the song though. I got more of a song about general struggle and adversity vibe, not as specific as rising sea levels and/or climate change. The live track, “Black Honey,” was recorded at Sirius XM. There is one track per side.

The 7” was limited to 2,500 copies, and is pressed on translucent blue vinyl. The Fact that this 7” is pressed on colored vinyl was never mentioned anywhere. It wasn’t on the official RSD list, no store made mention of it, the hype stickers didn’t nor did the band or any band members. It came as a complete shock to me, and probably everyone else who bought a copy too. But given the apparent meaning behind the song, the choice of blue vinyl is very fitting.

As aforementioned, there is not one but two hype stickers on the cover of this 7”. The obligatory Record Store Day sticker (though not one of those square silver foil RSD stickers) and another one indicating that a portion of the proceeds from this release got to Climate Central. Which I’m assuming is a non-profit  aimed at working towards environmental issues. Again, that Climate Central hype sticker is in line with the apparent them of the lead song, “Sea Change.”

A download card/code is included, which yields WAV files. There is no insert, and the jacket is extremely thin and cheap. It’s a shame, but that is becoming a trend with RSD releases; making them as cheap as possible while still charging top dollar for them. Of course there are always the super nice releases sprinkled in, but for the most part I’ve never been impressed with the bulk of the RSD releases I get, especially for the price charged for them. This 7” cost around $8 depending on the store, when it should have cost no more than $6 given what it turned out being. Because it’s an RSD release the powers at be feel like they can get away with tacking on an additional $2-3 to every release. I’m actually surprised this 7” came with a download card, many times RSD releases don’t. This 7” was one of two RSD releases I bought this year that actually came with a download card, and I wound up buying 10 releases this year.

Thrice - Sea Change - Copy

 


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Against Me! 7” was one of those other things I wanted, but felt wouldn’t be hard to find online for retail price. Especially considering I found the Against Me! 7” from 2015 that was far more rare, limited to 750 copies.

This Against Me 7” is limited to 4,000 copies as a picture disc. The picture disc unfortunately is the only variant for this 7”. An interesting note about this 7”, the official RSD list and any store that put up photos of the releases on their website used the b-side for the display image. Typically the a-side is the used for display/stock images. For the photo gallery below, the a-side is the first photo (from the left) followed by a photo of the b-side.

The official title for this 7” is “Stabitha Christie,” which is featured on the a-side. The b-side features “First High Of The Morning.” Both songs are b-sides from Shape Shift With Me. The record does not come with a download card, so the only way (as of posting this) to this hear the songs is by having a copy of this record.

Another interesting note about this 7” that was not mentioned anywhere prior to buying this; not even on the official RSD list, is that each copy is individually numbered. This numbering is down on the giant white square hype sticker affixed to the top left corner of the sleeve. The sleeve is obviously a picture disc sleeve. You think the fine folks who run RSD would emphasize the fact this release is individually numbered, because that feature is one of those buzz words/phrases that are used as sales tactics. And that seemingly innocuous feature does push some people over the edge to buy a release rather than not.

Retail on this 7” picture disc was around $9. A bit pricey for a 7”, but it’s higher than other RSD 7”s because it’s a picture disc, and they’re more costly to press.


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Gerard Way 12” was one of those other things I wanted, but felt wouldn’t be hard to find online for retail price. Especially considering it is one of those RSD first releases, meaning it would see a wider release after RSD.

I decided to pick this 12” picture disc up on RSD rather than waiting because I was a bit worried that the non-RSD release wouldn’t have the poster and comic that came with the RSD version/variant. I felt the price wouldn’t be much lower after RSD than on RSD as well, so if the non-RSD version didn’t have the poster and/or comic it would be a giant rip-off.

There seems to not be a consensus as to what the official title of this release is. The official RSD list has the title listed as “Into The Cave We Wander,” which is the lead track on the release. But places like Discogs, which I never trust or rely on for any info, has the title listed as “DC’s Young Animal.” To further illustrate why I don’t trust Discogs, they have the pressing info listed as 5,000 copies while the official RSD list has it listed as 4,800 copies. To muddy the waters a bit more on the title confusion, the hype sticker on the bottom left corner of the sleeve says “DC’s Young Animal” as well.

Personally, I’m sticking with the title being “Into The Cave We Wander” for several reasons. And not just because I don’t like Discogs. Here’s why. “DC’s Young Animal” is a comic/graphic novel series Gerard Way is curating. And this RSD 12” picture disc release was concocted solely to promote that comic series. A textbook example of the problems with RSD, but that is for another day. But that is why “DC’s Young Animal” is plastered all over this record. Not just the hype sticker, but the most glaringly obvious part being the comic this record comes with along with the poster. Another obvious aspect of this record being a promotional vehicle for the comic series is the artwork on the picture disc itself, which is straight from one of the comics in the Young Animal series.

All that is aside from the fact that 12” singles, or any singles for that matter, don’t have proper titles. They go by whatever the single’s name is or whatever songs appear on the single; the infamous “b/w” moniker. Anyway, this 12” single has two songs on it, the aforementioned “Into The Cave We Wander” on the a-side and “Film Excerpt – Poggy’s Cavern” on the b-side. An interesting note about the music, it’s not just Gerard Way, his old My Chemical Romance band mate Ray Toro is credited as writer and performer as well.

I mentioned it above, but the pressing info for this may be a bit misleading if you take Discogs into account. Discogs has this 12” single being limited to 5,000 copies. Of course, that is a nice round number, but the official RSD list has the pressing info as 4,800 copies. I will take the word of the official RSD list over Discogs any day, but even with that said the RSD list has mysteriously been changed/updated in past years. The RSD folks like to re-release the official .pdf list with minor tweaks, amendments, corrections; whatever you’d like to call them, and sometimes the .pdpf list doesn’t match up with the viewable list on the official website too. It’s why I download the .pdf the first day the official list is released and download another copy the day before RSD, to catch any discrepancies. However, none of that affected this Gerard Way 12”, the 4,800 number held strong to this day.

The comic that comes with the record is likely exclusive to this record. I know comic collectors can be as nuts as record collectors, and comics can go through variants and exclusives just like records. The Young Animal comic that comes with this records is a sampler, with short excerpts from each of the four separate titles in the series;  “Doom Patrol,” “Shade The Changing Girl,” Cave Carson Has A Magnetic Eye” and “Mother Panic.” The official title of the comic that comes with the “Into The Cave We Wander” 12” picture disc is “DC’s Young Animal Mixtape.” For copyright concerns I’m not posting photos of the entire comic, only a handful of pages, of which don’t reveal any major plot lines.

If you are into comics/graphic novels you’re probably aware that this 12” picture disc is technically not the first release of this single. It was released on cassette for New York Comic Con, and given to attendees of the Young Animal panel. That cassette is a promo release and not meant for sale, and guess what the title is; “Into The Cave We Wander.”

 

 


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Two Door Cinema Club 12” was one of those other things I wanted, but felt wouldn’t be hard to find online for retail price. And I’m right considering my store still has 3 copies of this sitting on the shelf more than two weeks after RSD. So do I regret buying this? No. Do I regret buying this for full retail price? Yes.

Despite what the cover art suggests, Live At KCRW features song off the band’s two earlier albums too, not just their latest effort Gameshow. The cover art is simply the artwork for Gameshow with the title “Live At KCRW” printed along the bottom. There were 3,000 copies pressed, all on black vinyl. There is a square white RSD release hype sticker affixed to the top right corner, it’s not one the official RSD silver foil stickers.  Lots of releases seemed to shy away from that sticker this year. The jacket is thing and the record is flimsy. There is no insert but a download card/code is included. One of only two RSD releases I bought that came with a download card/code. But there is a major problem with the download card.

United pressed the record and handled the download card too, like they typically do for records they press. But when you go to redeem the download you get an error message saying there are no files available after you enter the code. I filled out the contact form on the website but United still have not solved the problem. And it’s been over three weeks since I emailed them and there is still no resolution. They emailed me back  twice saying “when it’s fix we’ll let you know.” Ridiculous that they can’t simply send me the files directly if they’re too inept to properly fix the downloads for this record. When I pointed that out to them, they told me “we’re still waiting for the files to be sent to.” Yet they were miraculously able to press the record without the files. I’ve had some problems with United download cards before, and they’re usually polite and prompt with fixing the problem. But this it’s a train wreck, and frankly unprofessional.  I contacted the label, Glassnote Records, and they never replied back to me.

Here is the track listing. The songs were recorded live on October 26, 2016 at Southern California radio station KCRW for their flagship show called Morning Becomes Eclectic:

Side A

  1. Bad Decisions
  2. Changing Of The Seasons
  3. Something Good Can Work
  4. Are We Ready? (Wreck)

Side B

  1. What You Know
  2. Ordinary
  3. Sun
  4. This Is The Life

Two Door Cinema Club - Live At KCRW - Copy

 


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Pineapple Express Soundtrack was one of the other releases. But I debated buying the soundtrack due to it price; $35. Thankfully my store has a rewards program where if you spend a certain amount of money (accumulation tally) you get a $10 rewards credit. So I used that rewards credit to get the soundtrack for $25, a much easier price to swallow.

Considering I only wanted this soundtrack for the Huey Lewis And The News song, yes I’m nuts, the $35 price tag was even more ridiculous. To illustrate how ridiculous that suggested retail price was, there was a store selling copies of this soundtrack for $25 (before shipping) on Discogs. So odds are this soundtrack won’t be able to be given away, which makes me even crazier for buying. To be honest, I debated buying it as far as the point where I was walking in the door of my local store. Ultimately the deciding factor was regret of missing out on it due to it being one of the more limited releases I was interested in.

The Pineapple Express Soundtrack was pressed as a double LP limited to 1,800 copies, with all copies pressed on “Green Grass Marble.”’ The records do actually look like weed, which you can judge for yourself after looking at the photo gallery below. Typically I only photograph the a-side and c-side (if it’s a double LP), but with this record I opted to do the a-side and d-sides instead. The a-side and c-side labels are the same, save for the track listing, and the b-side and d-side labels are the same with the artwork. There are two hype stickers, both affixed to the top right corner. One sticker indicates the color of the records while the other is a RSD release sticker, but not one of those silver foil stickers though. That seems to be big this year; using a RSD release sticker but not the official silver foil RSD sticker.

The aforementioned Huey Lewis And The News song is the theme song for the movie, an original song Huey Lewis wrote for the film simply titled “Pineapple Express.” He is no stranger for writing songs for movies, and was embroiled in an infamous lawsuit over one. Other artists on the soundtrack included Cypress Hill, Mountain, Public Enemy, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony and Peter Tosh.

No download card is included, which is unacceptable these days. The double LP release does not come in a gatefold jacket, just one of those cheap, flimsy oversized LP jackets. An insert is included, but it’s not full size. So basically, the label cut all corners on this release and made it as cheap as possible while charging beyond top dollar for it. Typical RSD BS.

 


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Doors live LP was one of those other things I wanted, but felt wouldn’t be hard to find online for retail price. The Doors release was also something I could live without and could have been scrapped from my list purely to save money.

Live At The Matrix features The Doors set from the San Francisco venue on March 7, 1967. This marks the first time the set has been released on vinyl, but not the first time they were legitimately commercially available. This live set, although not with the same track listing, were released on the 50th Anniversary Edition of The Doors debut self-titled album, which was released in 2017. This 50th Anniversary Edition of The Doors has yet to be released on vinyl, only CD and digitally. But it wouldn’t surprise me to see it release on vinyl at some point, the label likely held off on releasing it on vinyl knowing this RSD release of the live set was coming out late in the year, and didn’t want to lose sales of the RSD release.

The pressing info for this Doors RSD release is a bit misleading, as it’s broken down regionally. The official U.S. RSD list simply puts the pressing quantity as limited to 4,500 copies. But upon further digging, Live At The Matrix is actually limited to 10,000 copies. There were just 4,500 allocated to the U.S. market. The rest went overseas and Canada. Odd that the majority of copies of a U.S. band was not made available in the U.S.; not even an nice even 50/50 split. I will add this though; after RSD the official RSD website was updated to divulge the fact this release is limited to 10,000 copies worldwide. They likely did this in an attempt to cover up the fact that they lied and to keep disgruntled customers from voicing their displeasure. It’s impossible to hide something that is blatantly stamped on the release itself (see hand numbering pic in the gallery below). The internet also works against cover ups like this too, as I found out the /10,000 info from a store’s (not my store) post on Instagram about a week before RSD.

All copies are individually numbered, another fact the official RSD list didn’t mention, but was updated on the official website after RSD. The numbering is down in gold foil stamping on the back of the jacket, in the top left corner. All copies also come in a full color, printed dust sleeve. The dust sleeve doubles as the insert, as it has the liner notes on it. It’s not just random artwork or promo photos. Every copy also comes sealed in one of those perforated poly bags that you need to tear open.

Here is the track listing:

Side A:

1 Back Door Man

2 Soul Kitchen

3 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)  (Live at the Matrix 3/7/67)

4 Light My Fire
Side B:

01 The Crystal Ship

2 Twentieth Century Fox

3 The End

 

This vinyl version of the 67 Matrix show omits two important and popular songs, likely due to time constraints. You get roughly 22 minutes per side for a traditional 33 1/3 LP, and the entire live set (at least what appears on The Doors 50th Anniversary Edition) clocks in at over 46 minutes. Why they had to cut two songs when they could have easily cut one song; “The End,” which clocks in at over 14 minutes. And a good chunk of that 14 minutes is “jamming” that is just Robbie Krieger playing the same notes several times as Ray Manzarek holds the same note for what seems like minutes. I like “The End,” but I’d much rather have “Light My Fire” and “Break On Through” instead. Those are the two songs cut from this vinyl release. “Break On Through is the opening track on the third disc of the The Doors 50th Anniversary Edition and “Light My Fire” is track 6.