Posts Tagged ‘V/A’


Just when I thought the embarrassing additions to my collection were done with; bam… more Yo Gabba Gabba records. The guy behind ETR started another “label” called Enjoy The Toons, which seems to deal only in soundtracks of various degrees.

Because this Yo Gabba Gabba! Fantastic Voyages record is part of ETR’s stable, it’s severely overpriced; $23 for a single LP on lightweight vinyl in a regular single pocket jacket with no insert. Because this is a ETR associated release, there is a vast amount of variants. There are six variants for this, and all of them are exclusive to some place or another.

ETR has three exclusive variants for this record, and there are three other exclusives out there spread out amongst three different retailers. The ETR web store exclusives are “Yo Gabba Gabba! Logo FunSplosion” limited to 100 copies, “mountain purple” inside clear with pink, yellow and red splatter limited to 150 copies and “Muno red” limited to 200 copies. The “Yo Gabba Gabba! Logo FunSplosion,” which is featured in the photos below, is yellow/orange swirl with blue and pink splatter and the “Muno themed” variant is clear red with solid red splatter. The “Muno” variant also has an exclusive b-side center label, which is Muno’s cyclopes eye.

The other, non-ETR exclusive are a white splatter limited to 250 copies, which is exclusive to Turntable Lab. Next up is clear with red, yellow, blue splatter limited to 500 copies, which is a Books-A-Million (BAM!) exclusive. This BAM! Exlcusive cost $36 before shipping, which is completely absurd considering all the other variants are already overpriced at $23 before shipping. If that $35 price tag was not high enough for you, the last variant cost $40 before shipping. And considering this variant is a UK exclusive of sorts, expect shipping to be expensive. This variant is a Zavvi exclusive, which is a UK based retailer, and it’s on “Plex split” limited to 500 copies. “Plex split” is yellow/silver, which is likely a half and half. Not sure where the dividing line is on this variant considering some of the other “split” variants have the line down the middle or at an angle, because I have not seen a photo of this variant as of posting this.

If you bought both Yo Gabba Gabba! releases (Yo Gabba Gabba! Hey! and Yo Gabba Gabba! Fansttic Voyages) from the ETR web store at the same time/in the same order, you received an exclusive fold out insert. This fold out has four different scenes/backgrounds from the show, which you can also use the “repealable” stickers that came exclusively with Yo Gabba Gabba! Hey! record. Regarding those “repealable” stickers, I don’t think they are actually “repealable.” I tried pealing one off the sticker sheet, and it felt just like a regular sticker with a very tacky back. And if I were to actually use them, it would be rather difficult to get the stickers back on their appropriate space on the sticker sheet, let alone off whatever I stuck them to.

The track listing on this comp is pretty extensive, and features some great bands/artists. Because most of the songs are kept to two minutes or less, way more tracks than you ever thought could fit on a single LP are crammed onto this comp. There are 23 songs in total, 11 on the a-side and 12 on the b-side. I bought this for The Killers song, which is kind of shameful, buying a record for just one song. Especially considering the other ETR Yo Gabba Gabba release had far more songs on it from bands I like and/or collect. Here is the track listing:

Side A
1. Yo Gabba Gabba! Theme
2. Biz Marki – Pancakes & Syrup
3. The Roots – We Have Fun
4. The Roots – Lovely, Love My Family
5. Chromeo – Nice ‘N’ Clean
6. Weird Science – Go Crazy Remix
7. Dataracok – Smile For The Camera
8. The Killers – Spaceship Adventure
9. Cut Copy – Fantastic Voyages
10. Metric –  Everybody Has A Talent
11. The Faint – Teach Me

Side B
1. The Shins – It’s Okay, Try Again
2. I’m From Barcelona – Just Because It’s Different Doesn’t Mean It’s Scary
3. Of Montreal – Brush Brush Brush
4. CSS – Dinosaur Dinosaur
5. MGMT – Art Is Everywhere
6. The Flaming Lips – I Can Be A Frog
7. Band Of Horses – Out In Nature
8. Belle & Sebastian – You Can Do It If You Try
9. Peter Bjorn & John – I Wish I Was A Spy
10. The Bird And The Bee – Cover Your Mouth
11. Mark Kozelek – Bedtime Lullaby
12. Yo Gabba Gabba! – Closing Time

 

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Just when I thought the embarrassing additions to my collection were done with; bam… more Yo Gabba Gabba records. Enjoy The Ride Records (ETR) had a hand in these. The guy behind ETR started another “label” called Enjoy The Toons, which seems to deal only in soundtracks of various degrees.

Because this Yo Gabba Gabba! Hey! record is part of ETR’s stable, it’s severely overpriced; $23 for a single LP in a regular single pocket jacket with a gimmicky “insert” in the form of a sticker sheet on lightweight vinyl. And because this is an ETR associated release, there is a vast amount of variants. There are six variants for this, and all of them are exclusive to some place or another.

ETR has three exclusive variants for this record, and there are three other exclusives out there spread out amongst three different retailers. The ETR web store exclusives are “Yo Gabba Gabba! Logo FunSplosion” limited to 100 copies, “Foofa themed” limited to 150 copies and “Muno themed” limited to 200 copies.  The “Yo Gabba Gabba! Logo FunSplosion,” which is featured in the photos below, is yellow/orange swirl with blue and pink splatter. The “Foofa themed” variant is pink with white circles and the “Muno themed” variant is clear red with solid red splatter. The “Muno” variant also has an exclusive b-side center label, which is Muno’s cyclopes eye. The pink in the “Foofa” variant is baby pink, and the white circles appear around the center label, as if they’re coming out from the label. These “circles” are also more like brush strokes than circles.

The other, non-ETR exclusives are a “Brobee” split limited to 250 copies, which is exclusive to Turntable Lab. “Brobee” split is half clear dark green and half solid mint green, which is split vertically right down the middle. Next up is a solid red/milky clear split limited to 500 copies, which is a Books-A-Million (BAM!) exclusive. This BAM! exclusive cost $35 before shipping, which is completely absurd considering all the other variants are already overpriced at $23 before shipping. If that $35 price tag was not high enough for you, the last variant cost $40 before shipping. And considering this variant is a UK exclusive of sorts, expect shipping to be expensive. This variant is a Zavvi exclusive, which is a UK based retailer, and it’s on “Toodee Blue.” Limite to 500 copies. “Toodee Blue” is a color in color, with the most likely color(s) being blue of some sort.

All copies of Yo Gabba Gabba! Hey! come with a “repealable” (that is how ETR spells “repealable” on his official web store, “repealable” is not actually a word) sticker sheet, consisting of 12 different stickers that range in size. You get a sticker of each of the four characters from the show, along with speaker cabinets and microphones, and  even a sign for the crowd. The stickers are meant to be used to re-create a scene with the characters playing live on stage, which is the cover art for this record. Which brings me to the next facet of these Yo Gabba Gabba records.

If you bought both Yo Gabba Gabba! releases (Yo Gabba Gabba! Hey! and Yo Gabba Gabba! Fantastic Voyages) from the ETR web store in the same order, you received an exclusive fold out insert. This fold out insert has four different scenes/backgrounds from the show, which you can also use the “repealable” stickers with. Regarding those “repealable” stickers, I don’t think they are actually “repealable.” I tried pealing one off the sticker sheet, and it felt just like a regular sticker with a very tacky back. And if I were to actually use them, it would be rather difficult to get the stickers back on their appropriate space on the sticker sheet, let alone getting them off whatever I stuck them to.

The track listing on this comp is pretty extensive, and features some great bands/artists. Because most of the songs are kept to two minutes or less, way more tracks than you ever thought could fit on a single LP are crammed onto this comp. There are 19 songs in total, 10 on the a-side and nine on the b-side. I bought this for the Weezer, Jimmy Eat World, Taking Back Sunday and My Chemical Romance songs. Here is the track listing:

Side A
1. Yo Gabba Gabba! Theme
2. Weezer – All My Friends Are Insects
3. Jimmy Eat World – Beautiful Day With My Best Friend
4. Taking Back Sunday – We All Love Our Pets
5. My Chemical Romance – Every Snowflake Is Different
6. Rocket From The Crypt – He’s A Chef
7. Mariachi El Bronx – Friends Can Make You Smile
8. The Aquabats – Pool Party
9. Gogo13 ft. Alex Desert – Pick It Up
10. DJ Lance Rock – DJ Lance Says

Side B
1. Metric – Everybody Has A Talent
2. Hot Hot Heat – Time To Go Outdoors

3. Devo – Watch Us Work It
4. Money Mark – Robo Dancing
5. The Apples In Stereo – That’s My Family
6. George Clinton ft. Madame Mims – Atomic Frog
7. Weird Al Yankovic – Circus Parade
8. Yo Gabba Gabba! featuring Jack Black – Goodbye Song
9. Biz Markie – Biz’s Beat Of The Day #1

 

 


Time Life, the people behind those late night music collection infomercials, seem to be getting into the vinyl game, as they’re releasing what appears to be a series of records. So far they’ve only done three volumes, but there is no indication they will stop there. These thankfully aren’t being pitched on late night tv, but are being hawked online for $25 for a single LP. Even going as far as to capitalize on Prince’s death with a purple colored variant in a second pressing that they’re actually charging more for than the black variant from the first pressing.

The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Live Series is currently on its third installment. If you’re not familiar with the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony, they typically feature the inductees performing along with special guests and various bands/artists perform cover versions in tribute. They’re usually star studded affairs, featuring some of the biggest names in music. Each volume in this series features exclusive live tracks recorded at several induction ceremonies. Volume 1 features an eclectic mix with the likes of Chuck Berry, Bruce Springsteen, Green Day, Al Green, James Taylor, Cream, Tom Petty, Prince, Metallica, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Flea, Joe Perry, Mick Jagger, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood and Dhani Harrison. I bought this compilation because it fills out several collections I have going; Green Day, Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty.

Volume 1 has actually gone through two pressings, unnecessarily so in fact. The first pressing is still readily available. But the folks behind the release decided to be shameless and capitalize on Prince’s death by pressing a new purple variant, in turn releasing a second pressing. They’re also charging more for it than the first pressing. It’s only $1 more; $26 instead of $25, but that is not the point. The record is advertised as being on 180 gram vinyl (first press), but it’s not.

Considering the hefty price tag for this record there should be more to it than just a standard weight black record crammed into a thin single pocket jacket. But that’s all it is. No insert, no printed dust sleeve, no gatefold jacket, no download card/code; nothing extra to eat into profit. One reason for the higher than average price tag might be the possible royalties and licensing fees involved with releasing this compilation. But still no excuse for charging $25 for a no frills single LP.

But with that initial retail price in mind, copies are starting to pop up on the secondary market at  slashed prices. You can pick up a copy for around $20 shipped. Some sellers have copies listed for $15 before shipping.

Pressing info has not been released for either pressing. One easy way to tell apart the first pressing, which is on black vinyl from the second pressing, which is on purple vinyl is by the addition of a second hype sticker on the second pressing. The second pressing has a purple sticker that reads “Limited Prince Tribute Edition On Purple Vinyl!” Both pressings have the same black hype sticker that says “First Time On Vinyl!” The barcodes are also different between pressings. The first pressing barcode is 6 10583 52622 6. The second pressing barcode is 6 10583 53172. The barcodes will help you discern the pressings if you’re looking to buy a copy of this record online. It’s fool proof to tell the pressing apart too.

Here is the track listing, with the year of the performance in parentheses:

Side A

  1. Chuck Berry With Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Johnny B. Goode (1995)
    2. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out (1999)
    3. Al Green – A Change Is Gonna Come (1995)
    4. Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Ron Wood, Joe Perry, Flea And Metallica – The Train Kept-A-Rollin’ (2009)
    5. Metallica – Iron Man (2006)

 

Side B

  1. James Taylor – Woodstock(1997)
    2. Cream – Sunshine Of Your Love (1993)
    3. Green Day – Blitzkrieg Bop (2002)
    4. Mick Jagger, Bruce Springsteen And The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Band – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (1988)
    5. Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood, Dhani Harrison And Prince – While My Guitar Gently Weeps (2004)

VA - Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Live Vol. 1

 

 

 


Once again I decided to camp out for Record Store Day (RSD), getting to my store 8 ½ hours ahead of opening. I know I said on Twitter that I likely wouldn’t bother with RSD this year, but things changed obviously. That thing was adding more and more things to my list, which ending the debate of do I want to go out for the one thing I know I won’t be able to find online for retail price. I’d rather not spend $30 on something if it means the only thing being sacrificed is a good night’s sleep. If you think I’m crazy for waiting that line and getting to a store that early, keep reading. But I do sleep for at least 2-3 hours of that wait time. If you want to skip this column-esque story, skip ahead five paragraphs for the start of the write up on this particular RSD release.

To lay the ground work for RSD this year, I actually had fun the past two years (2016 & 2017) waiting in line, which makes the time go by faster. That was not the case every other year, and I’ve been attending RSD since its inception in 2008. I had some cool people to talk to these past two years, which rarely, if ever happened every other year for RSD. I’m talkative person, it’s the other people who either can’t or refuse to hold a conversation for whatever reason. The past two years I was next to the same group of people actually. You see, at my local store, the same groups of people show up around the same time every year, especially the diehards. I’m talking about the real early birds, the people who get there 7+ hours ahead of opening. And at my store you have to show up by 4 am (for an 8 am opening) in order to have a serious chance of getting what you want. Otherwise you’re like 150+ in line and will spend around 2 hours (after opening) just waiting to get in and get checked out. It’s a popular store in a highly populated area.

For those curious about what store I go to, I never mention it because I want to maintain some privacy for myself. I don’t want people knowing where I live. It’s not a matter of turning people onto the store and having more people show up. Trust me, this store is well know and one of the most popular stores in the region. It draws people from four different states for RSD, and there are no shortages of record stores in the area either.

The only thing that changed in the 10 years RSD has been happening is how early I have to line up in order to get everything I want, or at the very least the few things I would have a hard time tracking down for a decent price online. I used to get to my store around 5 am, and got everything I wanted with no problem. But ever since 2015 the line has gotten out of control. I used to be no more than 20th in line with a 5 am arrival from 2009-2014, but I learned my lesson in 2015 after getting there at 2 am (thinking that additional 3 hours would be enough to compensate for the Deja Entendu release) and being like 50th in line, resulting in missing out on stuff I wanted for the first time ever. And I mean for the first time ever. Prior to that year I never missed out on a single thing on my list.

Ever since then my goal was to get there by midnight, and it’s worked. And I’ve had more fun in line than ever. People bring beer, people are more talkative, offer to get food and coffee for people and are just more helpful and nicer in general. I think a lot people are immediately grumpy when they get there later in the morning and come to the dreaded realization of how long the line actually is. The line can be a bit deceiving because it wraps around the building/strip mall. Lots of people see what they think is the end of the line at the end of the building/strip mall, only to walk over and discover it keeps going. I’ve heard plenty of obscenities being yelled at 5 and 6 am, some from like a hundred feet away.

That one thing mentioned above was the Thrice 7”. That is what drew me out for RSD, but I also picked up a bunch of other things rather than deal with paying for shipping and the potential for damage during shipping. The Pineapple Express Soundtrack was one of the other releases. But I debated buying the soundtrack due to it price; $35. Thankfully my store has a rewards program where if you spend a certain amount of money (accumulation tally) you get a $10 rewards credit. So I used that rewards credit to get the soundtrack for $25, a much easier price to swallow.

Considering I only wanted this soundtrack for the Huey Lewis And The News song, yes I’m nuts, the $35 price tag was even more ridiculous. To illustrate how ridiculous that suggested retail price was, there was a store selling copies of this soundtrack for $25 (before shipping) on Discogs. So odds are this soundtrack won’t be able to be given away, which makes me even crazier for buying. To be honest, I debated buying it as far as the point where I was walking in the door of my local store. Ultimately the deciding factor was regret of missing out on it due to it being one of the more limited releases I was interested in.

The Pineapple Express Soundtrack was pressed as a double LP limited to 1,800 copies, with all copies pressed on “Green Grass Marble.”’ The records do actually look like weed, which you can judge for yourself after looking at the photo gallery below. Typically I only photograph the a-side and c-side (if it’s a double LP), but with this record I opted to do the a-side and d-sides instead. The a-side and c-side labels are the same, save for the track listing, and the b-side and d-side labels are the same with the artwork. There are two hype stickers, both affixed to the top right corner. One sticker indicates the color of the records while the other is a RSD release sticker, but not one of those silver foil stickers though. That seems to be big this year; using a RSD release sticker but not the official silver foil RSD sticker.

The aforementioned Huey Lewis And The News song is the theme song for the movie, an original song Huey Lewis wrote for the film simply titled “Pineapple Express.” He is no stranger for writing songs for movies, and was embroiled in an infamous lawsuit over one. Other artists on the soundtrack included Cypress Hill, Mountain, Public Enemy, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony and Peter Tosh.

No download card is included, which is unacceptable these days. The double LP release does not come in a gatefold jacket, just one of those cheap, flimsy oversized LP jackets. An insert is included, but it’s not full size. So basically, the label cut all corners on this release and made it as cheap as possible while charging beyond top dollar for it. Typical RSD BS.

 


With the popularity of vinyl, you sometimes get re-pressing that are long overdue and releases getting pressed on the vinyl format for the first time that are long overdue. What you can’t control unfortunately is how they’re pressed. The Beavis And Butt-Head Do America Soundtrack was finally released on vinyl in 2016, but sadly as a picture disc.

My bigger complaint about this is that it falls into the cash grab category, capitalizing on two trends; picture discs and soundtracks. Lately the two go hand-in-hand, but that never used to be the case.  First it was the soundtrack craze, with labels cashing in on multiple facets of consumer culture; nostalgia, collectors and trendiness. There are film nuts and score/soundtrack nuts who will collect anything related to a film they like, and then there are people who don’t like the film, or haven’t even actually seen it, who still collect soundtracks/scores because they like the music. There will always be those who buy things for nostalgia’s sake, which sadly is a strong selling point with records these days. And it leads to things like picture discs, $35 single LP’s and stuff like My Little Pony and the Forest Gump Soundtrack clogging up pressing plants.

This soundtrack comes in a picture disc sleeve with a hype sticker affixed to the bottom right corner, with the sleeve having one of those re-sealable flaps. No idea on pressing info, and it will likely never be released because this is a major label release. No download card/code is included, which isn’t a huge shocker. The soundtrack was released for the film’s 20th Anniversary, which is noted on the hype sticker.

Circling back to the mention of $35 single LP’s, when this record first came out in April 2016, that was the price for it; $35. And it’s why I held off on buying this for almost one year after its release. It took that long for me to find it within the price threshold I wanted to spend. Prices have been steadily falling on this record though, just not fast/far enough. The price slashing has seemed to stall around $21. But considering original pressings were going for

The reason I wanted this comp is for the Red Hot Chili Peppers and No Doubt songs. The Chili Peppers contribute a cover of Ohio Players’ “Love Rollercoaster” and No Doubt has a song from their often overlooked The Beacon Street Collection; “Snakes.” Aside from those two bands, this comp features other big bands like Ozzy Osbourne, White Zombie, Isaac Hayes, LL Cool J and AC/DC.

This Beavis And Butt-Head picture disc does sound better than the Beavis And Butt-head Experience picture disc. There were some complaints with the sound quality of The Beavis And Butt-Head Experience picture disc.


With the popularity of vinyl, you sometimes get re-pressing that are long overdue and releases getting pressed on the vinyl format for the first time that are long overdue. What you can’t control unfortunately is how they’re pressed. The Beavis And Butt-Head Experience was originally released in 1993, as a picture disc. So this 2016 re-pressing being done as a picture disc is at least a bit understandable. Though no one would argue against it being pressed as a traditional record (on any color) in a traditional jacket with inserts and maybe even a download card/code.

My bigger complaint about this is that it falls into the cash grab category, capitalizing on two trends; picture discs and soundtracks (though The Beavis and Butt-Head Experience is not a soundtrack is the strictest sense). Lately the two go hand-in-hand, but that never used to be the case.  First it was the soundtrack craze, with labels cashing in on multiple facets of consumer culture; nostalgia, collectors and trendiness. There are film nuts and score/soundtrack nuts who will collect anything related to a film they like, and then there are people who don’t like the film, or haven’t even actually seen it, who still collect soundtracks/scores. There will always be those who buy things for nostalgia’s sake, which sadly is a strong selling point with records these days, and it leads to things like picture discs, $35 single LP’s and things like My Little Pony and the Forest Gump Soundtrack clogging up pressing plants.

Not much changed between the original 1993 pressing and this latest pressing released in 2016. The images on both sides of the picture disc are the same and the track listing is the same. The only minor differences are that the first pressing was a UK release (2016 release is a U.S. release) and the first pressing comes in a stock, die cut red  jacket, not a picture disc sleeve like the 2016 re-press. This jacket has a very large die cut portion, which is intentional in order to show off the picture disc. It’s just like the jacket that came with the Moneen/Alexisonfire Switcheroo Series picture disc I have, which you can read about here. The 2016 re-press has a hype sticker affixed to the bottom right corner of the picture disc sleeve, with the sleeve having one of those re-sealable flaps. No idea on pressing info, and it will likely never be released because this is a major label release.

Circling back to the mention of $35 single LP’s, when this record first came out in April 2016, that was the price for it; $35. And it’s why I held off on buying this for almost one year after its release. It took that long for me to find it within the price threshold I wanted to spend. Prices have been steadily falling on this record though, just not fast/far enough. The price slashing has seemed to stall around $21. But considering original pressings were going for

The reason I wanted this comp is for the Nirvana song, “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die.” Though there is an unnecessary lead in by Beavis And Butt-Head prior to the actual Nirvana track kicking in. If you’re not aware by now, I’m a huge Nirvana nut and will buy almost everything of theirs released on vinyl, even live bootlegs. So despite that lead in I bought it. Plus, at the time of its original release in 1993, this comp was the only place this In Utero b-side was released. Afterwards though, it was released as a b-side to the “Pennyroyal Tea” single and subsequent compilation releases like the With The Lights Out box set. This comp remains one of the only vinyl releases featuring the original version of this Nirvana song, along with the “Pennyroyal Tea” 7”. The 20th Anniversary Edition of In Utero has the 2013 mix of “I Hate Myself And I Want To Die.”

Aside from the Nirvana song, this comp features other big bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Megadeth, Anthrax, Aerosmith and even Cher. Yes, Cher may seem like an odd addition to anything Beavis And Butt-head related, but this comp has some original, albeit joke songs by Beavis And Butt-Head.

Some people are complaining about this re-press sounding awful, but what else can you expect with a picture disc? If you want audio fidelity you shouldn’t be buying picture discs. Is this record unlistenable? No. But it is one of the worst sounding picture discs I’ve heard? Yes. All the more reason this comp should not have cost $35 when it was first released, it’s not even worth $20.


There are many Christmas albums and compilations. Almost every band/artist has recorded at least one Christmas carol during their career, with many releasing entire albums. But every once in a while there is a compilation that features not only many great artists, but some of them performing the perfect Christmas carol. This is one of those Christmas albums.

A Very Special Christmas was originally released in 1987, and was a benefit album for the Special Olympics. It was re-released several times over the years, most recently in 2016. This latest pressing, featured here, was done as a 30th anniversary edition, despite it being released 29 years later. It was meticulously recreated from the original 1987 release. It features the same gold foil stamped cover artwork, which was done By Keith Haring. No word on pressing info, but for a release like this it really shouldn’t matter. All copies were pressed on black vinyl. Here is the track listing:

Side A

  1. The Pointer Sisters – Santa Claus Is Coming To Town
  2. Eurythmics – Winter Wonderland
  3. Whitney Houston – Do You Hear What I Hear?
  4. Bruce Springsteen And The E Street Band – Merry Christmas Baby
  5. The Pretenders – Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas
  6. John Cougar Mellencamp – I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus
  7. Sting – Gabriel’s Message

Side B

  1. Run-D.M.C. – Christmas In Hollis
  2. U2 – Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)
  3. Madonna – Santa Baby
  4. Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band – The Little Drummer Boy
  5. Bryan Adams – Run Rudolph Run
  6. Bon Jovi – I Wish Everyday Could Be Like Christmas
  7. Alison Moyet – The Coventry Carol
  8. Stevie Nicks – Silent Night